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Author Topic: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer  (Read 23861 times)

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Offline Hood

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #60 on: October 22, 2013, 02:37:13 PM »
Not sure if  the motor would be suitable for a normal VFD, it likely would but you would have to check up on the frequency/voltage etc that it needs.
The encoder should be fine as long as it is 5v square wave.
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #61 on: October 24, 2013, 01:51:18 PM »
OK, so the current task is to test the Servos/Amps and figure out how to get them running, Ill deal with the spindle once I know how big of a phase converter I need...  I took a good look inside the cabinet yesterday and followed the cables around to the master PCB and to the large transformer.  Unfortunately I couldn't tell what cables hooked up where so I don't know what the input voltage is for any of the Amps yet, but I got a part number so hopefully I can find some sort of wiring diagram.  If I can get these set up so they don't require an initial 3 phase input before hitting the transformer it will hopefully save me from having to buy a bigger phase converter.

To test an Amp I just need to connect it to the Servo, and hook up a (*********v?) battery to power the motor right?  Then put a little battery over the +/-10v to get it turning?  Obviously I can't be connected to the controller or anything, because there is no power but is it likely there are any other connections I need to have?  I haven't touched any of the wires inside the cabinet so I assume everything else should be connected however it was intended.

Offline Hood

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #62 on: October 24, 2013, 03:31:03 PM »
To test an amp you have it powered and the motor connected then apply a voltage of between -10 and 10v to the analogue inputs.
To test a DC servo motor you disconnect the motor and connect something like a car battery to the power wires of the motor and it will rotate, reversing the polarity on these wires will reverse the motor.
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #63 on: October 24, 2013, 07:53:04 PM »
Do I need to have the exact right power for the amp, or can I apply something low to prevent any damage but enough that it will give the motor some juice?  I will keep looking through the manuals for the voltage applied by the transformer...

Offline Hood

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #64 on: October 25, 2013, 02:58:26 AM »
Anything up to 10v would be what you are wanting but preferably a variable source as I suggested earlier as that will allow you to see how it behaves through the range of speeds.
A 9v battery connected via a pot will give you 0-9v and then reversing the polarity will give you 0 to -9v.
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #65 on: October 25, 2013, 08:56:36 AM »
Sorry I meant to power the Amp/Motor, not to send a signal to the motor.

Offline Hood

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #66 on: October 25, 2013, 09:29:23 AM »
I would think you will need to supply fairly close to the original, whatever that was.
I know they are DC amps but I have no idea if they take AC straight into them  or whether they use an external supply?
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #67 on: October 25, 2013, 09:49:56 AM »
That is what I was looking for the other day.  I am pretty sure that the Amps run back to one of the transformers so I am thinking that they run off DC, I just can't quite tell which wires go where because its all a huge rats nest at the moment.  Once the controller arrives and I will start pulling some of the bits and pieces out and hopefully have a better idea of what goes where.

Offline Hood

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #68 on: October 25, 2013, 01:29:50 PM »
It looks like the wires go direct to the transformer, if thats correct then it will be AC going into the drives. If it was DC then there would be at the very least a rectifier and most likely some big capacitors.
So assuming it is AC then you will likely have to feed very close to what meant to be going in which looks to be 190v?


Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #69 on: February 06, 2014, 09:51:13 AM »
Its been a while, hopefully someone will still be able to give me some more advice.
I ordered up replacement AC servo axis motors and drivers that will run off of the CSMIO IP/A controller, now I am trying to source a replacement for the antiquated spindle motor...
I believe that the last time I posted information about the spindle motor I may have missed a few details, but here is what I have, copied straight off the label:

FANUC AC Spindle Motor Model 3 (I do not believe that this motor is a servo any more, but is actually an induction motor)

RATING     CONT./30MIN   3.7/5.5 kw

AMP (~)    CONT./30MIN   17/22 A

VOLT (~)                 200 V

RPM                       1500/6000 rpm

POLES                    4 P

INSULATION            CLASS F

PHASE                    3

AMB. TEMP             40 C

My question is, what kind of motor and driver can replace this?  With the IP/A I assume I will need +/-10v analog control, and to use the ENC module it says I need an incremental encoder, are there any other features I should look for besides matching voltage, rpm, and power rating?  I know you have experience with the IP/A on a VMC Hood, do you have anything to add?

A replacement Baldor motor with these specs and matching driver (from Fadal) will be around $6k, I also found one from an automation company we use at work for closer to $10k...  I'm hoping to keep this in the <$2k range...  The best thing I did find was that CNCmakers.com had AC spindle servos, with incremental encoders and analog speed commands.

Thanks all!