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Author Topic: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer  (Read 23683 times)

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #80 on: February 06, 2014, 02:58:02 PM »
There is a "Optical Shaft Encoder, DC 5V, 1024 counts/turn" that is driven by a belt, that is the one I am assuming is garbage.  When I get home I can check the wires coming out of the motor itself and see if there is any sign of another encoder.  I wil also try looking around for 2500-3000rpm 7.7kW servos, I might be able to get one thrown onto my axis motor order before that ships.
I forgot to mention the belt reduction to the distributors I spoke with before, so they might be able to find me something for less than $6k as well...

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #81 on: February 06, 2014, 03:53:23 PM »
How many power wires go to your spindle motor? I am still thinking it is an AC two winding spindle motor rather than a servo.
Why do you think the encoder is garbage?
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #82 on: February 06, 2014, 08:07:35 PM »
There are 5 wire bundles, 1 encoder, 1 encoder power, 1 spindle power, 1 spindle encoder, and 1 spindle ground(?) wire.
I attached pictures of everything relevant.
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #83 on: February 06, 2014, 08:08:46 PM »
And drive stuff

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #84 on: February 07, 2014, 08:00:57 AM »
I am even more convinced that that is an induction motor. Not what you would call an ordinary induction motor but rather the type that is often used for spindles, ie usually dual windings so you can get the dual speed ranges by changing star/delta.
I have a similar style motor here, a Yaskawa and its drive, basically a very high end VFD with positional control.
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #85 on: February 07, 2014, 09:53:47 AM »
Do you think it would be possible/worth while to find a replacement drive and mount up a new encoder?  As I understand it the drive doesnt necessarily need to have positional control, but the encoder will feed to the CSMIO ENC module-I don't know if that makes it easier to find one.  Also since its an AC motor the drive has to be a pretty specific match for the motor corect?
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #86 on: February 07, 2014, 09:59:09 AM »
Also, like I said before I don't lnow if the drive is functional or not, if there was some way to test it without having to rebuild everything I could give that a shot.  I think part of my hesitation is just how antiquated that drive is, it seems like it would be a huge pain to try and get that to interact with the controller.
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #87 on: February 07, 2014, 12:49:16 PM »
I checked eBay, I can find replacement motors for under $1k, but the drives are $1.5k+
If there were alternative drives that would be perfect, I can save myself from buying a new motor/scrapping my old one and if my motor ended up being broken, a new one isn't going to cost me an arm and a leg.
I would be less inclined to buy a replacement of the same drive though, because then I am constrained to buying replacement Fanuc motors and drives to fix any issues.

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Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #88 on: February 07, 2014, 01:42:01 PM »
I think the big problem is Fanuc stuff is usually more expensive than other makes and also documentation is much harder to come by, so dont really know much about how the motor and drive works. If it is an induction motor (I think it is ) then a VFD should be able to drive it, the issue would be you are likely wanting positioning and tight speed control and that means top end VFD. I know Control Techniques make all sorts of drives, maybe the UniDrive range would work but you would have to contact them and ask.

If you had 415v 3 phase you likely could have picked up some Allen Bradley HV drives and MPL motors, that is what I have on most of my machines, the Beaver Mill has a 5Kw/4000rpm motor , the Chiron a 9Kw 3800rpm motor and the Computurn Lathe a 12.5Kw 2000rpm motor, all are MPL B series motors and use DSD-HV drives.


If you can hook up some power to the Fanuc drives I think you should be able to test relatively easily, there should only be a few signals required, enable being one.
Hood
Re: Machanical Automatic Tool Changer
« Reply #89 on: February 07, 2014, 02:46:26 PM »
I can look into getting 440v, but I don't really see that happening anytime soon...

When they list a rated RPM for the motor is that the max RPM?  Mine says 1500/6000 so would it be rated at 6000?  Like you said before I could go for a belt reduction to increate my spindle speed, it looks like the MPL-A 230v motors come in about the right ratio, 5.5kW and 4000RPM.

Those Allen Bradley motors look like the AC spindle servo from China I mentioned before.  I asked them about the 220 vs 380 and they said that they can rewire them for US customers with 220, so aside from finding a drive for less than $1500 I really think that may be my best bang for the buck.