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Offline Hood

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #160 on: February 17, 2011, 10:11:15 AM »
Not sure what your mains supplies are like in Canada, here in the UK we are 240v single phase, ie between a live and neutral we get 240v. What are you between live and neutral? If 110v then conneection as you have said is fine.

The plastic cover I am not sure what its for, presume just protection so that the laquer on the wires is not easily damaged thus causing a short. Dont worry about it being a fire hazard, my Bridgeport has had power to it for 5trs or more constantly and has not gone up in flames yet. Here a pic.
Hood

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #161 on: February 17, 2011, 03:37:04 PM »
Thanks Hood, yes our mains here have 110V between Live and Neutral and so we put to bed the AC connections.

I hope someone will chime in and say what the plastic wrap is for, just to learn although I think it makes sense in what you are saying. Nice job on your Bridgeport.

Here are some pictures on what I did today. The box cover is 9”x 6.5”x 4” High and each side is made of two aluminum sheets 23 gauge and all are riveted together. I still have to drill some holes on the sides for ventilation.

The base is made of two aluminum plates each 1/8” thick and they are bolted together on the exterior with two aluminum bars each 1/4" thick by 1/2" wide.

The items are now screwed to the base and I would like to know if we all agree that the location of each is correct.

The rectifier has not yet the silicone on its base in case I have to move it.

The bottom of the two capacitors is NOT touching the aluminum box bottom, it is about 1/8” higher. Don’t know if it is good idea to touch the bottom or not. I can easily lower it by loosen the clamps.

There is plenty of space around and on the top of the toroidal but for my education I would like to know what would happen if the toroidal body touches the aluminum box. I would have liked to install the box inside my control station sitting on its side but since the toroidal is so heavy I’m afraid that it may slide and touches the aluminum sides
Nicolas

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #162 on: February 17, 2011, 06:13:05 PM »
Questions remained to be answered:

Should the capacitors touch the base of the box? Now they sit about 1/8” off the base and supported with the clamps.

Can I install to unit on its side? In this case I have to tighten the toroidal so it will not slide

What would happen if the toroidal touches the sides of the aluminum box?

I have an aluminum ground bar in my control station now and all DC grounds (Black wire) go there. Should I also connect in this ground bar the ground (bare copper wire) from the AC? Good / bad idea to do so?

Nicolas
Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #163 on: February 17, 2011, 09:40:22 PM »
Hi do not take the plastic wrap of the transformer it holds the windings together. If you take it off the transformer will buzz as the current goes through it. the windings will not be held tight. Also if you take the wrap of and say some day you whant to take the transformer out to get it repaired it will fall apart on you... Oh and that transformer does not get hot neither does the capacitor or recifiers. Well not if they are big enough and they looik okay I have made the same power supply 3 years ago for my machine and they have never got hot or even warm. The geko drives for the motor though will get warm. Just warm. I have mine put on a 1/4 inch aluminum plate just bigger than the drives wide and long enough for all the drives on one plate. Put a computer fan at one end facing the plate even they  Havent got warm after that. only thing that gets warm are the motors.. and even after 4 or 5 hours they should not get to hot to touch. Just as warm as coffee.good luck.

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #164 on: February 17, 2011, 10:14:14 PM »
Thank you Larry, that is a very good info
Nicolas
Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #165 on: February 18, 2011, 09:00:12 AM »
are you at the power supply level all ready. how does you machine work.

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #166 on: February 18, 2011, 02:17:31 PM »
are you at the power supply level all ready. how does you machine work.

Larry the machine is working and you can see the video at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJvCtoMv814

I just want to replace the existing switching 36V power supply with the one I'm building now
Nicolas

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #167 on: February 18, 2011, 02:20:24 PM »
Here are the wiring pictures of the unit

Hopefully someone will tell me if all looks ok before I plug it in
Nicolas

Offline Hood

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #168 on: February 18, 2011, 05:15:00 PM »
Looks fine to me, only thing I would say is I would have the black wire (DC 0V) go to a terminal as well for easy connection. I never put my 0V to the base plate but the document seems to suggest that you should and I think others in the thread have also said so.

Hood

Offline kolias

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Re: Power Supply Unit
« Reply #169 on: February 18, 2011, 05:21:00 PM »
Looks fine to me, only thing I would say is I would have the black wire (DC 0V) go to a terminal as well for easy connection. I never put my 0V to the base plate but the document seems to suggest that you should and I think others in the thread have also said so.

Hood


I agree with you Hood, I will put the Black lead (0V) to the terminal as well until someone here tells me otherwise

Thank you
Nicolas