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Author Topic: ATC for lathe  (Read 17629 times)

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ATC for lathe
« on: September 08, 2007, 06:16:44 PM »
any one out there ever tried to make a rotary type tool changer for a small lathe project. I saw one for an emco mini mill size one once and I have no idea where I could even get one. but I thought about maby being able to make one using a sherline-cnc rotary table. Any one out there ever tried this or thought about it.
Chris

Offline poppabear

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Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2007, 09:04:31 PM »
Yes, I have it is easy to do, If you dont mind doing some VB scripting for your M6. You will also need to decide how your gonna stabilize your turrent once it gets into position.

scott
Commercial Mach3 & Mach 4, Design/Build/Retrofit CNC and Industrial machines.
http://www.ss-systems-llc.com/

Offline DAlgie

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Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2007, 09:09:47 PM »
I talked about this awhile ago here http://www.artsoftcontrols.com/forum/index.php?topic=304.0
   DaveA.
Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2007, 09:29:32 PM »
well how did you end up locking it.
Chris

Offline DAlgie

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Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2007, 10:05:16 PM »
It has a tapered pin in the rear of the turret, driven by a large electric solenoid. The design of the pin is a copy of an italian turret that  a Clausing Clochester Storm lathe uses. One important detail is to have the software 'vibrate' the turret a very small amount to help the pin settle in it's home, this design uses a stepper motor, so I would forward/ reverse the pulses just as the pin goes in to lock it. I haven't built it yet, but have all the materials and hardware ready to do it, probably will happen in six months or so.
   DaveA.
Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2007, 11:47:16 PM »
well Id love to see pictures as you make progress. any pictures would help really.
Thanks
Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2007, 10:24:02 AM »
Am retrofitting an Index NC lathe which already has an 8 position turret.
Since I know nothing about VB programming, has anyone done a macro for controlling the turret they would be willing to share?
TIA,
Claude
Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2007, 01:09:38 PM »
yes someone enlighten us as to what it would look like ???

Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2007, 04:17:38 AM »
Each and every tool changer is different, the software is custom written for each one, without knowing how it works and how the signals are laid out its not possible to even guess.

Tell me more about the turret, I will then give you a guide on how to program it.

Graham.
Without engineers the world stops
Re: ATC for lathe
« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2007, 11:12:27 AM »
I just got one off ebay so I havent recieved it yet but here is what the seller told me about it.

"Do you know how a rear hub on a bicycle works? The turret works in a similar way, in that it makes use of pawls. You have six pawls, each 60 degrees apart. Originally there was a 12vDC motor on there. One would supply 12v to the motor, and the turret would rotate. It would rotate the turret until it has completely passed the pawl. Then, the polarity of the voltage is reversed, and the voltage being supplied is cut in half. THis makes the motor rotate the other direction, backing the turret against the pawl. The motor doesn't cook because it is being supplied with only a few volts. I think it's a pretty clever arrangement myself, and leaves no room for positioning error. The turret is rotated via worm gear already, so it's pretty rigid to begin with. I think a step motor is better suited for the job because it doesn't require any extra circuitry (other than your typical stepper drive). "

obviously Im going use a stepper motor instead of a dc motor.
Is that any help.