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Author Topic: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations  (Read 10906 times)

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Offline bowber

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Title says it all really!

I'm looking for a supplier of small quantities of titanium (hobby use) in both flat and bar stock plus any recommendations for machining it.
I've seen some info that says HSS tooling is still the best and also don't let the tool skid as it'll work harden the surface instantly.
So what's others experience with titanium.

I'm looking to use titanium on a small job for it's chemical resistance not it's strength to weight so not sure the grade will make much difference.

Regards
Steve

Offline bowber

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Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2010, 04:09:07 AM »
Thanks

Looks like a usefull site for many materials, tried to get to the price list though and it didn't work, I'll try again later.

Thanks
Steve
Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2010, 05:26:36 AM »
Steve, McMaster-Carr here in the US ( http://www.mcmaster.com ) is a reasonable source for small quantities of materials (including Grades 2 and 5 titanium), but the shipping to the UK might be prohibitive compared to a local source.

Randy
« Last Edit: January 11, 2010, 05:28:50 AM by zephyr9900 »
Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2010, 11:48:03 AM »
I've had good luck with Titanium Joe:

http://www.titaniumjoe.com/

(Besides, they also sell Tee shirts with their logo...)

SF

Offline simpson36

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Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2010, 06:12:35 PM »
Titanium is not typically used for chemical resistance.

You might do better looking at stainless or the nickel alloys like Monel and Inconel.

Regular 316 SS is pretty much immune to about everything. Horrible to machine, though. What chemical are you resisting?
Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2010, 11:14:29 PM »
simpson36, 316 is not all that chemical-resistant.  Common ferric chloride (available at any Radio Shack or Radiospares, depending on where you live and used to etch printed circuit boards) will laugh in the face of 316.

And in the biotechnology instrumentation industry, we went from 316 (even passivated or electropolished) to titanium two decades ago.  Now all PEEK and ceramic and other non-metals in the liquid path.

Randy
Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2010, 11:56:44 PM »
Titanium is'nt that bad to machine. I machined a pistol scope mount from a solid block with highspeed tool bits. Run sfpm, aprox half what you'd use for mild steel. Save the shavings . they burn nice. Magnesium burns nice when you throw water on it. Titanium , just blow on it. But, carefull , burns very hot , got scars to prove it.  ;D
Ed VanEss

Offline simpson36

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Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2010, 04:50:06 AM »
simpson36, 316 is not all that chemical-resistant.  Common ferric chloride (available at any Radio Shack or Radiospares, depending on where you live and used to etch printed circuit boards) will laugh in the face of 316.

And in the biotechnology instrumentation industry, we went from 316 (even passivated or electropolished) to titanium two decades ago.  Now all PEEK and ceramic and other non-metals in the liquid path.

Randy


Ferric chlodide does not come in titanium bottles  . .  probably because there are cheaper alternatives.

316 is the standard in petro chem. Beyond that are the nickel alloys. Titanium is 'bio-compatible' and considering that instruments tend to use tiny parts, and that 'bio' is just another way of saying 'cost-is-no-object', it is not surprising that any bio-industry would use titanium. Titanium is used for dental parts and bone replacments too, not for chemical resistance or strength, but because it is 'bio-compatible'.

Titanium is not resistant to 'common' chemicals like sulfuric acid, which is used in anodizing, which is a 'hobby' activity. Not too many hobby level bio instruments or bone replacements being made with converted asian CNC machines, but lots of hobby anodizing rigs are in use.

However, pointing out specific chemicals that attack specific metals is academic when we do not know what chemical the OP is concerned about. Titanium is nearly 10 times the cost of 316 and comes with some hazards relative to machining it, so it seems prudent to know if is needed before taking that plunge, methinks. If he is building a ferric chloride pump, then he's on the right track, although I have heard of success using plastic aquarium pumps, which may be slightly less expensive.  

Titanium has good corrosion resistance to some chemicals, no doubt, but so do other less expensive materials. Titanim is used for primarily for its strength to weight ratio, being about twice as strong as 7075 (and 10 times the cost). With the notable exception of 'bio-compatible' applications, I would be surprised ot see titanium specified for chemical resistance over cheaper alternatives if strength and weight were not primary requirements.

And incidentally, www.onlinemetals.com has titanium in small quantities.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2010, 04:52:27 AM by simpson36 »
Re: Supplier of small quantities of Titanium and machining recommendations
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2010, 06:28:35 AM »
Ferric chloride is chemically reactive to everything metallic except titanium. So, that's not a fair comparison. I have a deep rooted dislike for any material that will burn uncontrollably like titanium, magnesium - and like that. Years ago in my machining days, I was face milling a slab of forged titanium with a 6 inch carbide face mill when the accumulated chips under the cutter burst into white hot flames and all I could do was watch in surprise and horror. I'll take a nice mild mannered piece of stainless steel any time over titanium for more reasons than that though. Steve (simpson36) is correct; stainless wins in this book too - depending on what specifically is being pursued of course. The Russians like the stuff - make entire submarines out of it - while Russian citizens eat beans....Stainless steel is much less political too!

Bill C.