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Author Topic: Another Turner's Cube.  (Read 32006 times)

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Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Another Turner's Cube.
« on: December 06, 2008, 07:34:54 AM »
I have made many things with the use of CNC that I would otherwise not have the necessary skills to make. The Lithophanes and Wood Carvings I have made are good examples of this.

So with the inspiration of Marcel, Poppabears 'Magic Cubes' thread and N4NV's reference to 'Digital Machinist' I set about making this Mini Turner's Cube (it is this size because that was the size of the alloy plate that I had).

I certainly do not have the necessary lathe skills so this was made on my recently acquired Boxford mill. In the end I used the Mach Wizards 'Circular pocket' and 'Cut circle' (thanks to Brian Barker and Kiran) for the code, which only required slight modification. The tools used were a 4mm slot drill for the pockets and a 10mm 45 degree undercut (dovetail) to free the center cube. A bit of polishing and it's finished.

Controversial perhaps, but something this exercise has shown me is that, in the fullness of time, CNC programing skills will replace the traditional trade skills for almost all manufactured items. Is that a good thing or a bad thing ?.


Tweakie.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2008, 10:42:31 AM by Tweakie.CNC »
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2008, 08:16:37 AM »
Sorry, I missed a photo in the above sequence.

This is the point where courage or faith in your programing is required. Total conviction.


Tweakie.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2008, 10:06:18 AM by Tweakie.CNC »
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2008, 08:58:31 AM »
That's nifty Tweakie......really nifty.
And I believe your last statement is correct.
After all, the car replaced the horse and the gun replaced the sticks n' stones.

Thanks,
RC

Offline RICH

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2008, 09:14:39 AM »
tweakie,
That is sweet and nice pictures as they show how you did it.
So on the last cutting of the inside cube, are you doing anything to hold it in place of just hoping it drops
away from the cutter?
RICH

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2008, 09:19:41 AM »
Hi Rich,

Nothing was holding the center cube in place, it did just drop away. I was holding my breath though.


Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2008, 11:58:59 AM »
Now that is a turner`s cube  . Now if you don't want an heart attack every time you make one ,make plugs that will replace the missing metal so when you put it in your vise it will hold your middle cube while you machine it.

Marcel Beaudry

Offline budman68

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #6 on: December 06, 2008, 01:57:34 PM »
Nic work, Tweakie, that's a beauty!

And Marcel has a great idea with the plugs but I was also thinking you could use a C clamp to clamp the square inside, and then clamp that clamp to the vise. That would make sure it wouldn't go anywhere for you.

I've had enough heart trouble.... I don't need more  :D

Dave
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Just because I'm a Global Moderator, don't assume that I know anything !

Dave->    ;)
Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #7 on: December 06, 2008, 03:01:20 PM »
There is another trick you can use when doing very complicated complex turnings in metal.you can fill the voids with epoxy let it harden 24 hours then machine your parts repeat as needed. Then use an epoxy solvent . >:D
« Last Edit: December 06, 2008, 03:05:12 PM by marcel beaudry »

Offline Sam

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2008, 03:23:19 PM »
Good stuff Tweak (as always). How did you polish it?
Quote
CNC programing skills will replace the traditional trade skills for almost all manufactured items. Is that a good thing or a bad thing ?
RC summed it up nicely. You can also think of it as a "new set" of skills, and not a replacement. You will still have to have machinist capabilities/mindset. The machines may be like a mindless robot, but the instructor sure has to have a good diverse skill set to instruct it. You better keep up with technology, or it will leave you sitting by the side of the road. Any advancement in technology in my eyes is definitely a good thing.
"CONFIDENCE: it's the feeling you experience before you fully understand the situation."

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Another Turner's Cube.
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2008, 04:04:00 AM »
Hi Guys,

When I was freeing the center cube, I had machined 5 sides and it looked as if the cube was still attached at all 8 points. I seriously considered Marcel's suggestion of the epoxy but decided to have a go at the final face anyway (impatience on my part). I was quite surprised when the cube dropped free and of course I was extremely lucky not to ruin the whole thing and break the cutter. You have to have luck in this world. If I ever make another I will certainly use supports for the inner cube when final machining.

The cube was polished by hand using 'T-Cut' and a piece of cloth folded round a flat needle file. The polishing took longer than the making.

                                    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I am still not sure about this skills issue. I really don't think that a 'CNC machine operator' needs to have engineering skills (some knowledge yes but skill no). But does a program writer need engineering skills ? (again some knowledge yes but skill no).

Coming back to this cube - if the programs have been written then surely anyone could make it whether they have skill or not.

I would be really  interested in your comments on this folks.


Regards,  Tweakie.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2008, 05:43:42 AM by Tweakie.CNC »
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.