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Author Topic: classes on g code and mach 3  (Read 16088 times)

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Offline jimpinder

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2008, 02:41:50 PM »
you could try this .

Even this, to me, is a bit fussy at first, but does contain some decent explanation of the syntax of GCode in the later paragrahs.

Print it out and stand it by the computer.

There are Books on the market, but I wouldn't know which to recommend.

www.linuxcnc.org/handbook/gcode/g-code.html
Not me driving the engine - I'm better looking.

Offline budman68

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2008, 02:48:22 PM »
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Just because I'm a Global Moderator, don't assume that I know anything !

Dave->    ;)

Offline Hood

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2008, 06:23:20 PM »
The G-Code button on the Mach screen opens up an html doc which gives a brief desription of each G Code, that might help you.

Hood
Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #13 on: July 04, 2008, 03:01:01 PM »
Dont waste your time studying G code. You will only write the most trivial of programs by hand. For any interesting work you will need to use some software to generate the code. Pick a good CAM system and lean it.  Any interesting parts will be thousands of line long, no one can write that directly.

For plain mechanical work I use Sheetcam. I recently bought Vetric Vcarve Pro and think its great for the more artistic and sign making work.

Offline ger21

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #14 on: July 04, 2008, 10:38:00 PM »
Dont waste your time studying G code. You will only write the most trivial of programs by hand.

Knowing what the machine should be doing (by understanding g-code) when it's not can sure make troubleshooting easier, especially for a beginner. I see a lot of people that have no idea what's causing there problems, when a quick look at the g-code can tell them instantly, if they knew what they were looking at.
Gerry

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http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/2010.html

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http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

Offline jimpinder

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #15 on: July 05, 2008, 02:56:41 AM »
Yes - I didn't mean for you to try and become a GCode expert - but as Gerry says - knowing the GCode helps to troubleshoot.

Ron - I think your approach might not be universal - I have a friend who has some BIG CNC machines - your have to winch the workpiece into place. He is maching parts for oil pipelines out of solids - and he writes all his own code. I am an engineer and the parts I make tend to be simple, axles and things and I write my code, because Solidworks takes too long.

Those who have written to the forum recently about jerky movement in CV and Adsolute Stop need at least to be able to look at the code and have a reasonable undertsanding of it, to be able to determine if their CAM system is writing arcs or lots of straight lines.

I want to do some nameplates next (not engraving) where the letters stick up from the backgorund - now I might need a CAM program for that !!!
Not me driving the engine - I'm better looking.
Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #16 on: July 05, 2008, 08:44:37 AM »
I agree that we need to be able to read basic Gcode. But I do not think one needs to spend days learning what is really trigonometry to be able to write G code. Even the simplest projects are likely to be more accurately done using decent software to generate the  code.

I have made several signs and name plates and obviously they would be impossible without CAM software. For simple tasks, like facing stock or circular pockets or bolt circles then use wizards to generate the code.

Offline jimpinder

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2008, 09:27:02 AM »
I must agree that most of my code is now a step up from writing lines of code longhand, because most of my regularly used programs are GCode macros in Vis Basic. I fill in various parameters and the Vis Basic generates the GCode directly to the machine, I never even see it.

All in all then, get to know your way round GCode, but don't spend too much time on it, there is lot's more fun to be had with good CAD and CAM programs.
Not me driving the engine - I'm better looking.

Offline RICH

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Re: classes on g code and mach 3
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2008, 10:35:01 AM »
Hi All,
Will use myself as an example.
I need enough to know how to use the MDI line to move the tables around and setup the job. Use the wizards because they just make things so easy and provides a nice place between writing code on one end and using CAD / CAM on the other end of the spectrum. The niche spot wizards provide, is you can use the CNC machine to do typical tasks and not feel it's easier or quicker to do it manually. On the CAD / CAM side you just can't beat having the code generated for complex things by a program. I could never write the code for the engraving work I have done. All the programs give you some quirky code and the ability to scroll down  / simulate the code , remove that one stupid line or lines, and know the effect is almost "mandatory".

I tend to learn what is needed to enjoy my bobby and constantly enhance as required. Remembering when I knew nothing about Gcode, just read the different definitions, played with the moves in a few programs and on paper until pacified. Got bored with that and went into using a CNC program to make chips.

When I reflect on CNC, it's not only the Gcode. CNC is quite complex, to a beginner overwhelming, computer, CAD, CAM code, controllers, wiring, machining experience, engineering expertise, etc.. Just think if your main background is only basket weaving it sure could be a challenge.
Gcode is only one part of the of the big picture. If it's your thing go for it!
RICH