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Author Topic: A Long Sad Story  (Read 18441 times)

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #30 on: October 09, 2007, 09:47:49 PM »
Bill take a look at this link!  http://www.pmtnow.com/  I think you will be amazed. I have not yet done inlay because my current machine has too much flex, which I feel would ruin both the inlays and the bits. the other thing I am wondering is the time involved in inletting an inlay using a bit that measures .005". I understand you would rough it out with larger bits progressing ever smaller, but by the time it is done I am not so sure you couldn't do it by hand.

Do you have a web site?

Mike
Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #31 on: October 10, 2007, 12:53:25 AM »
Those are exactly what I need!!  Of course I am going to have to get over some of the software issues that I am having, but I’m gaining some real optimism.  I do have a website (www.mountain-craft.com) but there really isn’t anything there yet, our production has been so slow, building our guitars with just standard tools, that we have not needed to put up a decent site as word of mouth has given us as many orders as we can fill.  I hope to automate the more time consuming tasks so that we can get to a reasonable production output. Thanks again for all of your help.

Offline bowber

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #32 on: October 10, 2007, 04:55:42 AM »
Bill

0.0625"and 1/16" are the same size. 1 divided by 16 = 0.0625

Steve
Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #33 on: October 10, 2007, 09:47:43 AM »
Steve:
Of course you're right! All this math, I have been spending so much time converting SAE to metric, I blew the easy one.  anyway I found the bits I need.  Thanks.
Bill
Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #34 on: October 11, 2007, 04:52:16 PM »
It is funny what a little poking around on the web will get you.  I have found what I need: http://www.precisebits.com/applications/luthiertools.htm plus they have a great deal of useful information about CNC inlay.  Maybe this will be helpful for the rest of you as well.
Bill
Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #35 on: March 24, 2008, 09:53:54 PM »
I have done the same thing when making a exhaust port header adapter.

I scanned in the old part into Corel draw.  Then I drew all the curves, drill holes etc, on top of my scanned picture.  When the complete piece was redrawn with corel I just deleted the scanned picture and was left with a new perfect drawing of the new piece.  Now, it was a little tedious, but it ended up being better then the original scanned drawing and I could modify it if I needed too.  I would think that you would need the full versions of both mach and lazy cam to do this.

But so far I haven't found a perfect way of scanning and posting code in one simple step.

Jonny

Offline jimpinder

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #36 on: March 25, 2008, 05:27:49 AM »
I haven't tried drawing with a CAD program, most of my work is relatively simple, and I can write the G Code straight to the machine (or on here and transfer it).

I have two of the programs mentioned in this post - Turbo Cad - which I find excellent as an accurate drawing tool, and I have just found a version of Coral Draw in my discs - which I must confess, I haven't tried.

I am wanting to design a spoked wheel, which will be then milled out of a solid disc - the wheel is approx 8 inches in diameter and about 1 inch thick. (It does not matter how long the program takes to mill it).

I can draw it in Turbo Cad and probably Coral Draw - but can anybody advise me what program to use to then translate that drawing into G Code for the machine - in fact - forget the wheel - has anybody any experience of converting drawings from Turbo Cad or Coral Draw into G Code.

I have converted simple 2D outlines into G Code milling patterns, using a program called Ace.exe - but how do the programs convert 3D drawings - I ssume they must layer them for the cutter depth.

Not me driving the engine - I'm better looking.

Offline bowber

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #37 on: March 25, 2008, 07:28:38 AM »
You'll need a 3d cam program like Meshcam to convert 3d models in to gcode, and it'll have to be a 3d model not 2d drawings.
Alibra design express is a free very easy to use program, and very powerfull.
It has some good tutorials with it as well.

Meshcam only has simple 4th axis control though so you may need to find a program that can handle rotating 4th axis gcode but you may find that meshcam can handle what you want to do.

Ok just re read your post, it looks like your wanting to mill out a something that looks like a spoked wheel, this can be done in Meshcam, you'll need to make a 3d model and use 2 sided machining.
Also I think you'll have to get a good bit of practice in designing in 3d before attempting to make a spoked wheel, you will be able to do it, it's just the way to go about it that'll take practice.
If I was doing it I think I'd create the rim and hub first using a revolved profile and then add 1 spoke and array it, then mirror the array and do the spokes going the other way in the same way.

I've never done it though so it'll most likely be a lot harder than it sounds  ;D

Steve

Offline jimpinder

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #38 on: March 25, 2008, 09:24:21 AM »
Yes - we seem to be a bit off post now, but I was thinking of  starting in the lathe for the rim, and facing and bore etc, then mounting it on a circular table to cut the spokes. In that wau I only need one profile, and then turn the appropriate number of degress and do it again.

Still - that's a bit in the furture - thanks for the info.
Not me driving the engine - I'm better looking.

vmax549

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Re: A Long Sad Story
« Reply #39 on: March 25, 2008, 02:33:14 PM »
JIM have you tired using the NFW wizards?? You can do a great deal with them and it will even complie all your moduals to gether as one complete program. Do you have a drawing of what you want to make??

(;-) TP