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Author Topic: parallel port to serial  (Read 548 times)

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Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2019, 11:59:17 AM »
Hi, looking at manual again - looks more like specific instructions for a company on how to use the machine and not much like a manual from company selling machine.
I have seen other places on the net where they say machine comes with a version of TypeEdit.
Might also be a different model to mine that had a USB or Parallel port, but does look a pirated version of Mach.
 

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Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2019, 02:33:49 PM »
if you are on the "retrofit road" IHMO the first things are (before buying anything):

-figure out witch stepper Motors are mounted, to get a idea witch stepper Controllers will fit.
-figure out witch spindle is mounted, to get a idea witch Controller will fit.

SmoothStepper is not a bad idea, even i am not a fan of These 5v Controllers.
anything is possible, just try it.
if you find some mistakes, in my bad bavarian english,they are yours.
Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2019, 02:52:36 PM »
Hi,
the Ethernet SmoothStepper (ESS) requires one or more breakout boards. A breakout board is a buffer that protects
the ESS and has screw terminals to attach wires.

A C10 is a simple and cheap ($23.00) breakout board. It will connect to one output port of the ESS. Thus the one board
will give you 12 outputs and 5 inputs. A second board is recommended, and if arranged such that the second ESS output
port pins 2-9 as inputs, then the second C10 will give you another 13 inputs and 4 outputs. The two C10s would under this
configuration give you a total of 18 inputs and 16 outputs. That should prove to be more than adequate.


The C10s are quite simple, they don't have opto isolated inputs nor do they have relays  or a PWM to analogue circuit.
I use Homman Designs  MB02 breakout boards (Australian made and near local to me in New Zealand) which are
very similar to the C10, that is they are bi-directional without opto isolators, relays or PWM circuit. I have used them
for six years without problem. Electronics is my thing, if I decide I need opto isolation on a particular input I add it; likewise
relays and PWM circuit.

Both the C10 and Homann boards are 5V boards whereas the CSMIO that TPS prefers has 24V IO. 24V IO is industry standard
and claimed to be more noise resistant, with some justification. Don't get me started on 'noise impeadance'.....I'm a radio
engineer and can talk about comparative noise performance all day long. Suffice it to say that 24V IO is nice but not essential.
In general 24V IO equipped boards are much more expensive. I have been using 5V boards for six years without problem
and do not regard 24V IO essential, nor even consider it a great advantage provided you pay close attention to the
'noise impedance' of the circuits to which you are interfacing. 24V IO allows you to be a bit sloppy whereas 5V tends
to focus your attention.

If you are not comfortable with adding circuitry to C10s then consider the MB03 board by CNCRoom at $180. It supports
all three ESS output ports with a balance of inputs and outputs including single ended and differential IO, relays and
a PWM circuit. I have not seen one myself but ger21 reports them to be good quality.

Note that these breakout boards do not drive the steppers but rather produce step/direction signals to the stepper drivers.
Your existing machine must have stepper drivers and you may be able to recycle those. If not you can buy entry level
stepper drivers for as little as $20 each or up to $150 for Gecko drivers, the gold standard among two phase stepper drivers.
Can you post some more info about your existing stepper drivers?

The most common way with Mach to control a spindle is with relays, up to three, to turn on/off, forward and reverse the spindle
and a PWM signal which is converted to a 0-10V signal to control the speed of the spindle. This is not the only means of
controlling a spindle but is most common.

Can you post more information about your existing spindle and its driver?

Craig
« Last Edit: July 09, 2019, 02:56:05 PM by joeaverage »
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!

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Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2019, 02:58:57 AM »
maybe a Little bit offtopic, but as Craig said i prefer CSMIO.

when i look for the CSMIO/IP-M it is 229.-€

-Mach3/Mach4 pluging
-real 0-10V Analog Output for spindle
-two analog Inputs for override potis
-all connetors included
-slave axis

ok, no backslash compensation, but IMHO backslash should be solved at the "beginnig" not at the "end".

PS. not getting anything from CSMIO for Promotion  ;)
anything is possible, just try it.
if you find some mistakes, in my bad bavarian english,they are yours.
Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2019, 07:49:17 AM »
Hi,
Looking at my motor driver boards, not much info on card, probably custom made same as controller card.
There is 6 IC's on card - A3955SBT, read up on them - need two to drive each motor(x,y,z)
Is there anyway to work out from IC how to connect to it?

Was thinking of trying to just bypass Controller card in machine and connect directly to Mach parallel port for initial testing.
Do you think this advisable or wasting my time?
Thanks
Paul

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Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #15 on: July 11, 2019, 08:06:11 AM »
have a look to the Motors for a type, then can can a look for a stepper Controller like leadshine and power supply.
anything is possible, just try it.
if you find some mistakes, in my bad bavarian english,they are yours.
Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2019, 08:14:21 AM »
Hi,

Quote
Was thinking of trying to just bypass Controller card in machine and connect directly to Mach parallel port for initial testing.
Do you think this advisable or wasting my time?

Do you have a PC with Window 7 32 bit or earlier?. If not.....the parallel port is a DEAD DUCK.....IT MUST operate on a
32bit OS.

Even if you have a working parallel port you will need a breakout board. The breakout board will produce step/direction
signal, but only signals, probably no more than 20mA. So what are you going to hook them to?

Those ICs are not bad but they are pretty whimpy.....1.5A @ 50V??? Wouldn't 'pull the skin off a rice pudding' in my book.
Do yourself a favour and get some  Leadshine AM882s, one for each stepper, they will make your steppers take notice
especially with a 72V power supply (recommended).

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2019, 08:19:54 AM »
Yes got a 32 bit windows 7 machine.
Cant seem to see anything on stepper motor that will identify it, just a a black motor. Ill try remove one and see if there is anything in front of it.
They have 4 wires from what i can see.
Re: parallel port to serial
« Reply #18 on: July 11, 2019, 08:28:54 AM »
Hi,
does it really matter what they are?

With drivers like the AM882 you can drive them at whatever current up to 8A you like. My guess is they have
current rating of 1.5A or less as evidenced by the driver ICs fitted. Just set your AM662 to 1.5A and try it out.
If the motor gets too hot (60 C0) then back the current off a bit.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!