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Author Topic: can someone recommend a decent limit switch  (Read 4165 times)

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can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« on: July 25, 2007, 11:24:04 AM »
Im combing through all the ginormous electrical component sites looking for a reasonably priced but apropriate limit switch to use for a lathe conversion. Im a bit overwhelmed by the sheer number and diversity of prices and types. can someone witj a little experience please just point me at a decent switch. my preference is that it is somewhat sealed to keep out dirt and oil.
Whats everyone else using.
Chris

Offline Chaoticone

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Offline Whacko

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Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2007, 05:55:41 PM »
I agree about the proxi switches, just be carefull where you mount it, so you don't get a false trigger from shavings etc.

William
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Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2007, 05:58:49 AM »
I used the Omron limit switch's.  They are great if your using them for a limit switch, but not repeatable for using them as a home switch.  I can get a variance of 0.010" depending on how tempermental the limit switch decides to be when I home out the axis.  It's clearly just an inexpensive switch, they only cost $15 each, roller plunger style and the plunger has quite a bit of slop.  Problem is now I'm looking for decent home swith's with the same mounting bolt dimesions.  I highly recomend paying for decent home switch's, or home/limit switch's.  The cheap ones will work good for the other end of the axis.

Michael
Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2007, 09:32:37 AM »
Yeah , I guess Im looking for something that will work as a home switch too.
Do the proximity switchs work well in that application?

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Offline Greolt

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Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2007, 06:42:42 PM »
Look at this Ebay item. 180140979019

This seller has a range of Tend limit switches.

I have had good success using them as home.

Greg

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Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2007, 08:33:56 PM »
Yeap, prox. switches work well for home switches too. A couple of benfits that I didn't mention, they are no contact switches. They don't touch anything, they sense. Also, if you are never going to be running certain materials, ie. ferrous, non-ferrous, etc. you can get prox switches that only detect those types of material. You can make you target out of that and will never get a false trigger due to a chip. If your machining Alum. get some that will only see steel. It can be covered in alum chips and will not send a signal until it sees your steel target.  ;)

Brett
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Offline DAlgie

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Re: can someone recommend a decent limit switch
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2007, 06:49:23 PM »
I uesd a prox switch for the X axis on my lathe, and a roller micro for the Z axis. The Z axis doesen't have to be very accurate as you are always resetting the zero for the end of the stock. The X axis, on the other hand, must be dead accurate because this is the machine's accuracy, with the tools you have set. If the X axis is not accurate then the diameters will be different with each tool you use, which is a problem for a lathe. I used a tenth microstepping Gecko drive, a .200" ballscrew, and drive it 2:1 with a tooth belt, this gives tenths of a thouasandth in diameters of inches, which is a standard lathe accuracy limit.
                                                 Dave A.