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Author Topic: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW  (Read 1725 times)

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Re: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW
« Reply #10 on: February 12, 2018, 06:43:46 PM »
Hi,
as the pic shows the feedrate is only 6 units/min when you first fire Mach up.
I used the F300 command in my initialisation string for several years to good effect before migrating to Mach4.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2018, 09:59:37 PM »
Hi,
as the pic shows the feedrate is only 6 units/min when you first fire Mach up.
I used the F300 command in my initialisation string for several years to good effect before migrating to Mach4.

Craig


Craig - I think I got the motors tuned. But regarding your post on the spindle. I'm thinking more about and wondering if the controller should be upgraded to one that will control the speed and actually run it? So if I change tools, the rpms will be right for the cutter.

What controllers should I look at that can offer faster operation and performance? (and, one that works on an X3 mill)
Re: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2018, 10:24:30 PM »
Hi,
what sort of spindle do you have?

Unless there a real need save your money.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2018, 10:43:30 PM »
Hi,
from what I've found you have a 1kW spindle, probably an AC induction motor.

If you wish to control its speed you'll need a 1kW (min) VFD, don't buy a cheap crap one, they don't last.
From what I read its currently capable of 1750 rpm. With a VFD you might push that out to 3000 rpm
but if you don't want to destroy it not much more. Admittedly its probably not inverter rated but you could risk
it...the insulation could possibly fail but I've had reasonable success with standard motors on VFDs.

Such a spindle might give you reasonable torque, enough for smallish tools in steel. If you want to do engraving
or machine aluminum then you want something way WAY faster, try 24000 rpm. There are such spindles,
there are lots of Chinese ones and most of them work pretty well. They are high speed low torque, good for
engraving and aluminum but crap in steel. Stick with the spindle you've got for steel.

Either way you'll need a VFD. Hitachi do a good line of devices, quality at a fair price. Delta likewise do good value/ quality
units. Don't go cheaper...there are lots and lots of them and they go bang all the time!

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: Syil X3 Spindle Not Turning On (and) Axis Moving SLOW
« Reply #14 on: February 13, 2018, 01:03:54 AM »
Hi,
I've just re-read my post and its in error.

Your spindle is almost certainly a single phase induction motor and not amenable to speed control.

Three phase induction motors with a variable frequency drive are very controllable however. Also three phase motors tend to be much smaller than single phase
motors of the same power. It is highly probable therefore that you could remove your single phase motor and replace it with an even more powerful unit and still
fit in the same hole.

There are a few issues that you should be aware of:
1) Line frequency (normal) induction motors work with VFDs but the high frequency switching causes severe stress of the insulation. Motors made for VFDs are called
'inverter ready' and have much improved insulation. A good quality American/British/European/Japanese motor will survive, I've had pretty good luck with them,
but Chinese and Indian made ones often aren't up to it.
2) With a VFD its possible to spin an induction motor much faster than its rated speed. You risk having the rotor explode because of centrifugal force. A rotor in a 1450rpm
(50 Hz) or 1750rpm (60Hz) motor is identical to a rotor in a 2900rpm (50Hz) or 3500rpm (60Hz) motor. It possible to take such a motor up to about 4000 to 4500rpm
without damage. I've done just that. Don't want to push my luck any further though!
3) Cooling. Almost all induction motors are fan cooled. If you slow it down the current remains the same and it still gets just as hot but the fan is now way too slow to cool
the motor and it will overheat. If you try to run an induction motor at less than half its rated speed its probable it will happen. You could mount an additional fan.

If you take some commonsense precautions a line frequency three phase motor and VFD can be a pretty cheap and reliable spindle motor.
The high speed spindles all over the internet are also pretty damn good. They have angular contact bearings built in and can handle cutting forces.
Either of these alternatives would work but they aren't free!

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!