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Author Topic: Router/Mill Design & Build  (Read 10944 times)

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Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2016, 07:29:27 AM »
Decision made I had seriously under estimated how hard the ballscrew material was going to be, so drilling from end between steel pulley ans shaft would have wandered so.
Significant flat ground on one side and loc-tite to ensure grub screws stay put will be my plan of attack for now, just dremelled first one and grub screw replaced by an allan head A2 stainless machine screw should be sufficient to prevent rotation and lock pulley in both directions.
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #11 on: May 02, 2016, 07:30:02 AM »
Got ten minutes to inspect the plug on X axis and it had a problem caused by old age and drugs, I got older massive doses of steroids prescribed eyesight went to crap, some plonker managed to rotate pins by 90% when soldering late the other night, easily fixed glad I didn't use a 6560 for this build the driver would have gone pop and I would be soldering a new TB6560AHQ IC into the board and tales of magic smoke would be told.
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #12 on: May 02, 2016, 07:30:42 AM »
Bit of progress made over the weekend sorry to say weather was nice so my bikes took most of my free time been neglecting them too much lately they need riding and I need the exercise getting old, London Surrey 100 end of July and Box and Neath hills are both killers if you are out of shape and practice. However fixed problem of slipping pulleys before it occured, a bit of testing/tuning first cuts a few slats of 25mm mdf which I have decided to use for first sacrificial bed, had a selection of 2020 off cuts laying around from printer builds etc so using these for clamping t-slots gives me 5mm to skim as needed. Using 6mm Router bit 1st DOC 3mm 2nd 6mm 3rd 12mm MDF using 12000rpm and 1500mm pm feed no problems with cuts. I have used a BOB I was given I think its a cheap chinese import and I appear to be having occasional problems, axis will refuse to operate in one direction, jogging a different axis then frees the original axis to move as required so another BOB on its way, double checking wiring next on to do list, all wiring is CY shielded cable currently all mounted in small pc tower case whilst waiting for cabinet to arrive so may just be everything to close for comfort. VFD is mounted well away from everthing else.

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Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2016, 08:18:20 AM »
Nice work sir. Let's hope that changing the BoB cures the axis one way problem (issues such as this can occur when using an opto-isolated BoB feeding into an opto-isolated driver).

Tweakie.

( You must have some stamina - the Zig-Zag got the better of me some years back and I don't consider myself old yet  :D )
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2016, 03:06:23 PM »
Your only as old as the woman you feel I need to find a younger one, I am only 57 this time but stubborn enough to get round and raise a bit more cash for McMillan.

Thanks for the info and yes I have opto isolated Bob and Drivers so fingers crossed.
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2016, 12:41:39 PM »
Nice work sir. Let's hope that changing the BoB cures the axis one way problem (issues such as this can occur when using an opto-isolated BoB feeding into an opto-isolated driver).
Tweakie.

The new Bob solved the problem thanks for the heads up, I still can't get my head around how opto isolation on two seperate circuits has can affect each other, do you have any more information on why this would cause a problem?

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Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #16 on: May 04, 2016, 01:10:04 AM »
I am pleased that you have found the problem.
I have not looked into the reasons behind opto - opto problems, perhaps it's timing related, it is just that this issue has been reported on the forum many times in the past.

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2016, 03:58:29 PM »
And award for plonker of the week goes to ME!! rushed back so I could skim the bed before it got too late, I had trammed it in on an old offcut of ply last night. Set it up to face at 1.5mm DOC at 1.5mpm 6000rpm and it glided around leaving a nice clean finish, straight edge and a CREE to check and a blind man would have been glad to see it.  :o Who decides wants to play some more and take just 0.2 to see how it goes, fired up the spindle and thought I would try the new hand control thats sat here for a week, DAMN straight down and 1mm ding in the freshly skimmed bed, well it can stay as it is for now until I feck it up again!!! Anyway have to remove the grease nipple on bottom bearing to skim it as it holds just off the edge since I fitted that side.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2016, 04:01:09 PM by lucan07 »
Re: Router/Mill Design & Build
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2016, 02:49:37 AM »
Regarding the ballscrew hardness. The way that I dealt with my machine (actually an acme lead screw, instead of ballscrew), was to place the lead screw into the 3 jaw chuck on my lathe. Then locked the headstock, to prevent rotation, and used a cut off tool, to scrape a slot in the end of the lead screw. The slot was cut to match key stock which matched an existing slot on the motor coupling (in my case). It could have just as easily been a drive pulley slot (as in your case). The key slot cut into the lead screw was not cut all the way to the end of the lead screw. Which provided a "tub" slot for the key stock to be seated into. Once the motor coupling was assembled onto the lead screw, a transfer punch was used, to mark the center of the grub screw hole into the key stock. Then it was disassembled, and the key stock was drilled at the screw's center, to provide a Secure Grip of the grub screw of the motor coupling, into the detent drilled into the key stock. The key stock being seated into the "tub" slot of the lead screw prevents ANY slippage from occurring end to end! Tip: if you don't have a carbide cut-off tool for cutting the ballscrew, try mounting a Dremel tool with an abrasive wheel into the tool holder of your lathe, and cut the slot with that! It works, no matter how hard the steel is!
Good luck on your build. Looks like you've got it going on!