Hello Guest it is October 17, 2019, 04:51:51 AM

Author Topic: Electro-Punch design  (Read 11557 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline BR549

*
  •  6,902 6,902
    • View Profile
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2016, 12:04:03 PM »
Looks good but you will have following problems with that  pin and cam setup.

Just a thought, (;-) TP

Offline stirling

*
  • *
  •  2,188 2,188
  • UK
    • View Profile
    • www.razordance.co.uk
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2016, 12:32:39 PM »
Cheers Brett

<sarcastic-mock-teenage-voice>
  Yeah Terry - it's like a scheme suggestion not a design.
</sarcastic-mock-teenage-voice>

 ;D
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2016, 12:42:44 PM »
Hey Russ - how about something like this?


That does look good Ian.

I had thought earlier about a similar method that kept the lower pincher fastened rigidly to the sliding <------> assy. The cutting op is about a foot or so from the exit of the straightener so a slight flex of the matl is OK.
What I couldn't figure out was how to precisely match the actuation of the <> sliding assy to the flow rate of the material.
Pneumatic, or hyd would be difficult to "time" unless there was a gripper of sorts to clamp the stock to match the cutting action to the feed of the matl.
Unless you considering  just initiating the pinch, then let the feeding of the matl itself do the activation of the <--> sliding assy. ? ? ?  Which I do not think would work very well.
Encoder following of sorts with a servo and screw (like Brett mentioned earlier ?) would be a bit overly complex ... I think.
Timing is critical. Maybe a mechanism like this on a free floating spring centered platform. Adjust as close as possible, the let the free float compensate for the variations ?
Just wondering what you had in mind for these issues.
Nice drawing too !
I did some "hammer" experiments while the wife was shoveling ..(grin)   ;D will post a pic and and notes soon.
Thanks Ian,
Russ

Offline Chaoticone

*
  • *
  •  5,607 5,607
  • Precision Chaos
    • View Profile
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #33 on: January 25, 2016, 02:05:17 PM »
Quote
I did some "hammer" experiments while the wife was shoveling ..(grin)   Grin will post a pic and and notes soon.

Just remember, this is a kid friendly forum.  ;D
;D If you could see the things I have in my head, you would be laughing too. ;D

My guard dog is not what you need to worry about!
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #34 on: January 25, 2016, 02:39:34 PM »
 :D
Man, if I could only see inside that head of yours ...... I'd wear a welding helmet.  :)

That's classic  :)

I will be careful of the pics.  ;D

Thanks Brett, I needed that.
Russ
 :)

Offline Chaoticone

*
  • *
  •  5,607 5,607
  • Precision Chaos
    • View Profile
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #35 on: January 25, 2016, 04:43:20 PM »
 ;D
;D If you could see the things I have in my head, you would be laughing too. ;D

My guard dog is not what you need to worry about!
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #36 on: January 25, 2016, 04:54:20 PM »
This is what I was experimenting with.
Left illustration was a temp set-up clamped on the table to compare impact / mass / return spring relationships.
I only used 1/4" valves and tubing, so easy enough to go bigger if necessary.

It had a surprisingly heavy wallop. I'm making 2 new cutter blocks to verify by actually cutting some sample material.

On the right is what I thought I would put together.

The outer tube will be a surplus steel hydraulic cylinder.
Threaded cap on the top for the air fitting.
The weight itself will have a groove with an o-ring or lip seal.
The spring connecting pin will pass through the weight and through 2 opposing slots in the outer tube to
              prevent rotation of the weight keeping the upper cutter block aligned.
The springs will only be heavy enough to reliably return the weight to its upper position.
The position of the exhaust ports are positioned to allow the hammer to return the blocks to the open position instantly, with no interference.
A special quick exhaust valve might not be necessary at the inlet port as there will be 5 seconds or more before the next cycle.

See anything that could use improvement ?

This is the least complex solution so far ( I think)

Will be searching for the recommended metal and treatment for the cutter blocks to withstand the beating. The cutting edges aren't the major issue, it's the flat parts of the blocks that slam together that concerns me.

Still tryin to draw like Ian .... some day.  :)
Thanks folks,
Russ
 :)



Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #37 on: January 25, 2016, 08:11:09 PM »
To further simplify:

Basic 4 way valve, quick exhaust on the extend stroke, spring just enough to carry the weight.
When fired, the cyl extends fully, the weight continues on compressing the spring and completing the cut (with some spring travel left), then immediately rebounds to an open position by the spring.
De-energize the valve and retract the cyl, standby for the next cut.

Will have a tube with slots to guide the weight as before.
This would eliminate possible issues with the longer springs and positive retraction.

This will be fairly easy to try.

Russ

Offline stirling

*
  • *
  •  2,188 2,188
  • UK
    • View Profile
    • www.razordance.co.uk
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2016, 04:50:51 AM »
I reckon you're on the right track there Russ - looking good.

Still tryin to draw like Ian .... some day.  :)

Those are great drawings. Is that Rhino you're using?
Re: Electro-Punch design
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2016, 06:41:28 AM »
I think "9" was also the price.  :)

Not very powerful, but neither am I. ;D

Thanks Ian,
Russ