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CHNC retrofit
« on: January 29, 2007, 01:03:31 AM »
I need some advice from the experts here...

I'm in the middle of trying to figure out how to best retrofit my Hardinge CHNC using Mach3 and am stuck on how to drive the spindle.  The stock DC spindle motor on the machine was recently rebuilt, so I'd like to keep it on the machine (and I have a spare on the shelf besides) but I have no idea what kind of drive would be best to control it with.  The original control uses a 90VDC GE drive that can put out 85 amps. 

I'm open to any and all ideas that anybody might have (that includes retrofit with an AC motor if it's the absolute best route).

Also, any input on the servo drives would be great.  I'm keeping the original motors as they're in good shape and I have a spare set.  They are 90vdc...I'm looking at the Rutex R2020, 200v 40A so I can accomodate larger motors in the future if I want.  Again, any input is appreciated.

Thanks,
-Ryan
Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2007, 08:47:36 AM »
I have a Hardinge with a GE control that I would like to retrofit. Have you figured it out?
Any help would be appreciated.

Offline Chip

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Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2007, 08:31:12 PM »
Hi, Guys

Have a CHNC1, It's +-10 volts servo amp. So ether a +-10 volt to Step/Dir board, Used Rutex 991's on last servo Machine, Guess there hard to get now, Or a S/D servo amp.

Probably Use "Brain Control" for all the relay's, Jog Wheel should be straight forward.

Just haven't had time to look at it, To far down the List rite now.

Not much Help, Chip
Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2007, 07:03:45 PM »
I need some advice from the experts here...

I'm in the middle of trying to figure out how to best retrofit my Hardinge CHNC using Mach3 and am stuck on how to drive the spindle.  The stock DC spindle motor on the machine was recently rebuilt, so I'd like to keep it on the machine (and I have a spare on the shelf besides) but I have no idea what kind of drive would be best to control it with.  The original control uses a 90VDC GE drive that can put out 85 amps. 

Hardinge had a way of using weird stuff in their CNC lathes. The problem with a 90VDC spindle motor is the large current requirement.  Otherwise I would suggest a servo drive such as the Rutex 2040.  You really need 3-5hp to get the most out of a CHNC.  That would be pushing the Rutex beyond it's comfort zone.

Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2007, 07:58:41 PM »
Quote

Hardinge had a way of using weird stuff in their CNC lathes. The problem with a 90VDC spindle motor is the large current requirement.  Otherwise I would suggest a servo drive such as the Rutex 2040.  You really need 3-5hp to get the most out of a CHNC.  That would be pushing the Rutex beyond it's comfort zone.


Quote

I came to the same conclusion regarding the Rutex 2040, although that was my first choice due to the simplicity.  I haven't gotten too far on my retrofit yet...got sidetracked with a VMC retrofit instead.  I figure a larger DC drive (alot of people suggested the Emerson Focus drives to me) or put an AC spindle motor in it with a VFD...

Let me know what you figure out!

-Ryan
Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2007, 07:24:56 PM »
As far as I know, Mach still doesn't provide servo control of the spindle (i.e. a rotary axis). So there isn't much point in having a servo spindle when a simple DC drive or VFD AC drive will do.  VFD's are so inexpensive these days you might get a complete system for less than a high current DC drive alone. They're getting rare and surplus units are a gamble.

Offline N4NV

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Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2008, 09:40:41 AM »
Ryan

I sent you a message on one of your other threads.  What type of stepper did you get to fit in place of the air motor?  do you have any pictures?  Also, do you have a part number for the worm gear?

Thanks

Vince
Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2008, 10:54:15 AM »
Vince,

Sorry, I didn't notice your post before. 

I'll have to take some pics of the setup to show you what I did exactly but I'll tell you quick anyway.  I couldn't find a stepper to fit directly where the airmotor was so I mounted one on the steel plate at the end of the carriage (the plate the wires pass through) and ran a driveshaft out to the worm.  Actually, I used parts from the old airmotor to mount the driveshaft in the casting.  The only downside is that you need to put a 1/2" spacer between the rear cover and the carriage to clear the stepper...not a bad compromise I figured though.

I'll try to get some pictures for you when I get a chance.

I don't know much about the worm as far as part numbers go...I just used the one that was in the machine originally.

-Ryan

Offline N4NV

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Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2008, 02:21:09 PM »
That's almost exactly what I thought I would do.  My only other problem is I don't have the worm gear from the air motor or the encoder for the turret.  If I can get a servo or stepper to drive the turret, I won't need the encoder.  I an guessing that I can use Brains to run the turret.  You can follow my progress here:
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50685

Thanks

Vince
Re: CHNC retrofit
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2008, 04:21:15 PM »
I have a couple of questions.
1. Where did the Artsoft Convention go?
2. Has anyone actually retrofitted a Hardinge CHNC? If so, does someone have the bill of material, etc.
Thanks