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Author Topic: spindle estop  (Read 1782 times)

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spindle estop
« on: September 09, 2012, 11:55:28 PM »
I converted a bridgeport boss mill to mach. The spindle is powered by a TECO 7300 VFD. Under load, I get an estop. I have read about noise but would like thoughts as how to fix it. I am running a smoothstepper with the current configuration

Offline Hood

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Re: spindle estop
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2012, 02:49:38 AM »
Try adding a small amount of filtering to E-Stop entry in  the SS config.
Hood
Re: spindle estop
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2017, 09:35:16 AM »
CNC Friends
I have been working on getting my spindle working with MACH3 for two months,

The system is:
Huanyang VFD, C32 BoB with USB SS,
The VFD is connect to the PC with a RS485 adapter
What is happening is SS driver error when the spindle is activated, it runs for 1 or 2 minutes then the error.
Could it be noise ?

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: spindle estop
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2017, 10:54:25 AM »
Noise sounds like the most likely cause.
If they are not already fitted try fitting clip-on ferrite's at each end of your USB cable.

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: spindle estop
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2017, 11:55:33 AM »
Hi,
putting ferrites on the USB cable is a good idea. Tweakie suggests one at each end. If you put one somewhere near the middle you will break
the USB cable into two pieces, at least as far as radiation is concerned. Two shorter 'antennas' will pick up less than one longer one. This assumes
you are using a USB Smoothstepper...not an Ethernet Smoothstepper. Ethernet is far more resistant to radiated noise the USB and is preferred.

It is highly probable that the noise is being conducted rather than radiated. That is that current demand from by the VFD which is by far and away the
most demanding load will cause voltage fluctuations on you input supply which will in turn cause fluctuations in other voltage supplies like your PC.
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: spindle estop
« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2017, 12:04:39 PM »
Hi,
should continue and give you the solution....plug your VFD into a different 230V outlet to that of your computer or other power supplies.

There are 'line reactors' which are made for VFDs to limit conducted noise. In industrial situations large VFDs can 'pollute' an electrical supply
and the supply company will be after you with sharp knives! A hobbyist is unlikely to draw that sort of attention but its entirely possible to
locally pollute you own power supply and the supply company are going to say 'serves you bloody right!'.

Try in the first instance separating the VFD and PC supplies. If it is effective then you may need to consider some sort of filtering setup.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: spindle estop
« Reply #6 on: September 16, 2017, 03:46:40 PM »
Hi,
should continue and give you the solution....plug your VFD into a different 230V outlet to that of your computer or other power supplies.

There are 'line reactors' which are made for VFDs to limit conducted noise. In industrial situations large VFDs can 'pollute' an electrical supply
and the supply company will be after you with sharp knives! A hobbyist is unlikely to draw that sort of attention but its entirely possible to
locally pollute you own power supply and the supply company are going to say 'serves you bloody right!'.

Try in the first instance separating the VFD and PC supplies. If it is effective then you may need to consider some sort of filtering setup.

Craig

Good advice Craig, I confirmed a VFD noise problem last year when the problem went away if I used an extension lead to the far end of the shop to power the VFD.

 - Nick