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Author Topic: Compensating for table misalignment  (Read 1554 times)

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Offline ajl53

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Compensating for table misalignment
« on: September 03, 2012, 12:45:27 PM »
Hello,
This is my first CNC build and I have completed a project with a 30x48 table. I am using Mach3 and CamBam for design. After setting all the parameters I checked the accuracy by measuring cuts across the x and y axis and have an acceptable tolerance of about .002 in. My problem is the table is slightly off relative to the gantry in both the x and y axis. it appears to be linear so I am asking if there is a way to compensate the z axis relative to the position on the table so that when I set up a milling operation the depth of the cut is constant across both x and y.
Thank you for any help

Offline Hal

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Re: Compensating for table misalignment
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2012, 01:35:52 PM »
You need to square your machine. Can you shim the table? You can check this by using an indicator. Mount it in the spindle. Swing the spindle to check the Spindle centerline to table top. Move the indicator around the table to check the table flatness. You might be able to adjust the guides to get the table flat or shim the table.

Hal
Re: Compensating for table misalignment
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 04:03:49 PM »
Hello,
This is my first CNC build and I have completed a project with a 30x48 table. I am using Mach3 and CamBam for design. After setting all the parameters I checked the accuracy by measuring cuts across the x and y axis and have an acceptable tolerance of about .002 in. My problem is the table is slightly off relative to the gantry in both the x and y axis. it appears to be linear so I am asking if there is a way to compensate the z axis relative to the position on the table so that when I set up a milling operation the depth of the cut is constant across both x and y.
Thank you for any help
You refer to compensating on the z, if that part refers to the table not being flat to the routers movements, you could cut the table surface and that should fix it for the most part.

John