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Author Topic: TB6560  (Read 6076 times)

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TB6560
« on: November 28, 2011, 12:12:32 PM »
Hi All
I want to have more powerfull motors than 263oz I have presently.
I have  seen these
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Stepper-Motor-4Nm-Nema23-566oz-1year-Warranty-cnc-parts-/120811893754?pt=UK_BOI_Industrial_Automation_Control_ET&hash=item1c20f333fa
and want to know will the TB6560 drive them? and are there any other problems?
thanks Graham
Re: TB6560
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2011, 12:15:12 PM »
I perhaps should have said it is a 4 axis machine
Graham

Offline RICH

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Re: TB6560
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 08:29:34 PM »
Preformance depends on the delivered voltage and amps available from your power supply and driver specs. Not sure if those  drives are limited to 3 amps and 24 volts.
If you had a motor curve you could get an idea of motor torque and speed  you will have. Also depends on how you wire the steppers.
So yes they will work but maybe you won't get more power than you have now.
RICH
Re: TB6560
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 04:28:10 AM »
Rich
Can you explain a bit more?
According to the data sheet for the board it is 24v 1.5amp to 3amp.
The motor supplier says
"Yes this driver will work with our steppers, you can use them in series to give you better torque but slower speed or in parallel lower power but higher speed."
So I presume I would have to wire them in series.
Why wont a bigger motor 566oz against 263oz not produce more power?
New to electronics and all these terms >:(
Graham
« Last Edit: November 29, 2011, 04:41:36 AM by GRAYHIL »

Offline stirling

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Re: TB6560
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 06:32:14 AM »
You haven't given the specs of your present motors but I suspect that your *real* problem is the drivers.

According to the data sheet for the board it is 24v 1.5amp to 3amp.
Doesn't mean much without motor specs.

The motor supplier says
"Yes this driver will work with our steppers, you can use them in series to give you better torque but slower speed or in parallel lower power but higher speed."
Doesn't mean much - but it might get him a sale.

Why wont a bigger motor 566oz against 263oz not produce more power?
Beacuse (very simply put) motors don't *produce* power, they convert electrical *power* into mechanical *power*. If the electrical power isn't there in the first place, *more powerful* motors arn't going to improve anything.

Not a lot to go on but my guess would be you'd be better off replacing your drivers than your motors.

Ian

Offline RICH

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Re: TB6560
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 06:44:49 AM »
Graham,
Difficult to compare preformance without motor curves  at different voltages and amperages . So one would need to see what torque can be had at 3 amps for each motor.
Maybe you will only get half the torque out of the 566 in comparison to the 263 which may have full torque. Additionaly depending on how they are wired that torque value
will change. The max speed of the motors are voltage dependant and also influenced by the motor characteristics. As speed is increased torque will decrease and that also varies
depending on how wired. In general the higher the torque rating the slower the max speed. What you are are interested in is power which is max torque over some speed range.
So the  motor power range will vary depnding on voltage and amperage available and you are limited by the driver and possibly the power supply also. So in general
one would need four different motor curves showing preformance, two for each motor which shows different curves depending on how wired. You need to use curves specific to
the motors and not compare to other manufactures information.

The general statement "in series to give you better torque but slower speed or in parallel lower power but higher speed"  are true, but, one needs to consider / compare
more than that when comparing different motors for an amplication since other things come into play.
 
RICH
Re: TB6560
« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2011, 06:55:00 AM »
Rich
This is what I originally bought
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CNC-Kit-3A-4-Axis-Driver-Stepper-Motor-Power-Supply-/260901875466?pt=UK_BOI_Industrial_Automation_Control_ET&hash=item3cbef6af0a
Do you still think a better board is required to give more power or bigger motors?
Is there anything else I can do.
One of the motors is geared down but I can stop machine movement in that axis by holding the machine cross slide.
Same with all the others.
It cuts wood and plastic resonably (cut some 48tooth 8" Dia 1/8"thick plastic gears) well but I want to cut steel/ally.
Am I expecting too much?
Graham
Re: TB6560
« Reply #7 on: November 29, 2011, 06:58:38 AM »
Rich
Where will I find "motor curves" thats a new term to me.
Graham

Offline stirling

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Re: TB6560
« Reply #8 on: November 29, 2011, 08:06:58 AM »
at the risk of being ignored again I'll give it one more shot. According to your link your motors are rated at 3.6mH. That means that for max speed/torque combination the optimum voltage is 60V. Your power supply is 24V max - way too low. Plus the blurb on your link states "High voltage will burn up the chips or stepper motors!!!". This is misleading at best. With a decent driver 60V would NOT damage your motors. However with THAT driver it WILL damage the driver and MAY damage the motors. Motor curves will help you to understand this but won't change the facts.

Ian
Re: TB6560
« Reply #9 on: November 29, 2011, 03:14:13 PM »
Stirling
I did not ignore you, as i said i am new to electronics and have a lot to learn and try to understand.
So it seems what goes in  from the power supply via the board gives you more power at the motor, that I understand now.
Seems like my whole system is underpowered for what I expect it to do.
Graham