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Offline Chief

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Determing proper cutter
« on: April 26, 2011, 05:36:22 PM »
Hi All,

I am very much a novice, and as I attempt to learn, I've been trying to run the files that are already coded, such as Mach's roadrunner and the nice Wile Coyote file found here.  My question is, does something in the G code tell you what size cutter the author intended for these files, or are you supposed to figure it out based on experience?
Thanks
Chief

Offline BR549

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Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2011, 06:28:30 PM »
Some Gcodes are produced with cam that adds in the tool info for you as a reference. SOme people acutally addd it in as well to hand written code.

(tool1, .375 2f FN)       tool1 is a 3/8 diam 2 flute flatnose cutter

When that is not available then you must check the code for the smallest radius cut. Then select a tool that is smaller than the smallest radius. Otherwise Mach will error about using too large of a cutter. OR if you are manually tool changing then you will Gouge the part and have a miss shapened part that is not to spec.

Hope that helps, (;-) TP
Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2011, 07:11:58 PM »
Welcome aboard Chief,
   My impression of the Roadrunner file was that it was included as a sample that would be intended to be cut with a V cutter or engraving tool ( or plotted with an ink pen ) as it appears to be a contour drawing that is not offset to either side.
   I just experiment with the depth of cut to get the desired appearance.

Big fan of the F4-U and the Phantom, and the Tomcat, and the A6 and the Hornets.
Russ
 

Offline Chief

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Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2011, 08:00:44 PM »
Guys,

Thanks for the replies, sounds as if unless the author puts in comments it's going to take some detective work..   which is OK, after all I'm doing this for the fun of it anyway!  The idea about looking for the smallest radius is very good, it makes sense.

Russ, glad you are an airplane fan, I've spent some time with Phantom's, but I was around long enough that I was there for the first introduction on both Tomcats and Hornets.  I was maintenance chief when we converted VF 213 from F4N's to F14A's, later I stood up the first East Coast Hornet squadron (VFA-131) and moved them from the training base in California to Cecil Field (Jacksonville) FL.  I was in St. Louis for the first flight of a Hornet!  That was a long time ago, 1978, and it seems like a lifetime LOL.

Thanks again Guys
Chief

Offline BR549

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Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2011, 08:31:28 PM »
Some of us cheat a bit with unknow files If you set up the tool offset in mach then simulate the code Mach will TELL you(error) about the tool too large for radius (;-)

Just a thought, (;-) TP
Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2011, 09:35:40 PM »
WOW !
Can't get enough plane stuff. My brother took me on a dependants cruise back in the late 70's on a carrier, been addicted ever since.
THANKS, I could listen to plane talk for hours. I can only imagine the stories you could tell.

(;-) TP is really sharp with this code stuff, you're (we're) in good hands.
Russ


Offline Chief

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Re: Determing proper cutter
« Reply #6 on: April 27, 2011, 02:29:13 PM »
Thanks again for the help guys, i"m going to try the roadrunner this afternoon, I think.  I may just set a large tool (like 0.5) and air cut it to see what error I get then I can decrease the size until it run OK.

Russ, the dependants cruises were alway fun, because it meant we were on the way home, and there were usually some pretty girls on the ship!  There weren't any female sailors on carriers in those days, so girls were rare....
Chief