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Author Topic: Keyboard Emulator  (Read 4487 times)

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Keyboard Emulator
« on: March 09, 2011, 12:48:02 PM »
I picked up the kit from Texas Micro Circuits, and then downloaded the G code to engrave the faceplate.  It was cut in 1/16" sign material and then glued to the enclosure. There are good directions available on line, and it is nice to be able to have control right on the mill table. The 4th axis is setup and running also,  I just need to modify the base to mount in the T slots.

If you think you can't do it, you're right.
Re: Keyboard Emulator
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 01:12:09 PM »
Nice job.

Would be fun if you could post a video and information details about the controller.

Did you write brains or VB scripts.

Great project.

Jeff

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Keyboard Emulator
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2011, 01:29:13 PM »
Nice job Sandcrab, really neat.

Jeff - Video's and info are on the TexasMicro site http://www.texasmicrocircuits.com/

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Keyboard Emulator
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2011, 01:40:31 PM »
Tweakie beat me to it. Randy Ray wrote a series on the pendant for Digital Machinist and offers it in kit form. It is an SBC plug and play unit that will alllow for the addition of a ZTO to set tool height.
If you think you can't do it, you're right.

Offline N4NV

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Re: Keyboard Emulator
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2011, 04:57:42 PM »
What kind of glue did you use to attached the material to your plate?
Thanks

Vince
Re: Keyboard Emulator
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2011, 08:35:32 PM »
I actually used a touch of super glue in each corner of the blank to hold it to the gridplate, and then after the engraving was done sliced it off with a razorblade. I also used superglue to bond it to the enclosure and then trimmed the edges and drilled for the LEDs and switches. I was running this first as a test, but it turned out so well I used it. If I had evaluated the file in a little more detail I would have seen that the blank could have been mounted on the enclosure first and the holes would have been machined through the lid also. The way I mounted it the engraver went into the gridplate, and I had to edit the depths to finish the through holes.
If you think you can't do it, you're right.