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Steps are too big
« on: October 03, 2010, 11:11:57 AM »
Hello

I'm having some trouble setting up my machine. I bought a ZenToolworks 7/7 diy kit a while ago and it worked flawlessly. I've changed my PC, still XP OS, but now having no end of trouble.

I've got it working, to  degree, except I can't post to Mach 3 from Cut2d, so I've given up on that, I just go to load the gcode manually.

However, it seems like the machine is working in inches(possibly)  when I've set the native units to MM's. It's taking way too big a step per command. I've uninstalled and reinstalled I don't know how many times and gone through masses of settings and nothing has helped.

I've tried changing the step pulses and that hasn't worked either.

Can anyone make any suggestions before I go loopy?

Regards.

Offline Hood

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Re: Steps are too big
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2010, 12:11:55 PM »
Presume its steppers so
What microstepping are your drives?
What pitch are the screws?
Is there any reduction between motors and screws?

Hood
Re: Steps are too big
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2010, 12:23:52 PM »
Hi Hood,

Good questions, how do I find out, to both?! I don't know think there is redution between the motor and screw.

Rgds.

Offline budman68

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Re: Steps are too big
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2010, 12:52:02 PM »
I would think this info would all be in the DIY kit?

Dave
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Offline Hood

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Re: Steps are too big
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2010, 01:24:08 PM »
If you didnt get info with the kit I would be surprised but if not then pitch of the screws can usually be measured quite easily by either seeing how may threads per inch or if metric the distance of one pitch.
 As for gearing if there is a belt and pulley between screw and motor you can count the teeth on each or mark both and rotate then and count how many turns the motor does to turn the screw once.
Lastly the drives, well that would depend on the make, you will have to find documentation for them.
Hood