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Author Topic: How can a CNC machine save time?  (Read 5731 times)

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Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2009, 06:13:58 PM »
Twangggggggg,  sorry my violin just bust  ;D

Without engineers the world stops

Offline Hood

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Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #11 on: December 26, 2009, 06:19:12 PM »
Twangggggggg,  sorry my violin just bust  ;D



You are lucky you have a violin, I just have a rubber band and a shoebox.

Hood

Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #12 on: December 26, 2009, 06:29:18 PM »
 ;D  ;D  ;D  ;D  ;D  ;D
Without engineers the world stops
Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2009, 12:52:42 AM »
Graham didn't watch the U-Tube....

Bill C.

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2009, 05:58:48 AM »
Ahh - My Grandad told me about the Good Old Days when all the machines were shaft and belt operated from a central steam engine. Some poor s** had to stoke the boiler and get steam up before he started work at 6am. I think he did actually operate a CNC machine (Coal Not Coke).  ;D

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: How can a CNC machine save time?
« Reply #15 on: December 27, 2009, 07:57:06 AM »
On a serious note: My grandfather had a company that manufactured locust insulator pins for telephone poles. The plant was all steam powered with line shafts and flat belts all over the place. The main machine building was built of white oak and was all post and beam construction, tennoned and pinned together to support the machines and line shafting. Talk about watching; that was most mesmerizing. I spent many summers creating havoc around the mill and my granddad. The building is still there in Huntersville, WV. and last visit, the engine and most of the equipment is still in place. Steam was king back then... The plant was always located near a river or stream for a water supply so there was never 'nothing' to do..

back to business...

Bill C.