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Offline kolias

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LC Terms
« on: August 30, 2009, 10:10:07 AM »
So far I have been using my CNC router drawing with a pen various shapes to learn how the machine behaves and works.

Next step is to make a simple sign with LC to try to cut it on MDF or wood material. There are some terms in LC which I’m not familiar with:

If I set my tool touching the work surface, do I also have to set the Plunge Clearence in LC or I can leave it at 0.0000.

What is Pocketing
What is a Relief
What is Layer Leadin Setting

In the tool dialogue
What is the Spindle Speed? That is my router speed?
What is good plunge feed to cut wood with a router,
What is a good feed rate to cut wood

Nicolas
Nicolas
Re: LC Terms
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2009, 03:53:43 PM »
Pocket can be square, rectangle or any form inside a piece:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQ_4nudh_v0

Relief is machining with the z axe:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gk7E-o6EDek&feature=PlayList&p=D78DE74DE8661429&index=11

Spindle speed is related with the Gcode S: like S5000 is 5000 RPM

Feed is related with the Gcode F: Like F20 is 20 inches per minute or could be millimeter depending or your setting

Plunge feed, you will have to experiment by yourself depending of your machine design but could be 5 to 20 or could be as high as 100

vmax549

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2009, 04:24:39 PM »

Offline RICH

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2009, 05:26:36 PM »
Nicolas,
Layer Leadin Settings - shown on page 23 of the manual, also see Tutorial #7 as gives examples.
  A lead is a series of tool / axis axis movements before actualy machining a contour or a pocket. So on approach to the contour it is a leadin and leaving the contour it is a lead out. The leads have to do with programing methods of moving the tool. Both provide for where a cutter offsetting wil be applied or canceled. So there are some rules which apply to the programing. In LC a pocket or contour is usualy on a layer  and additionaly you can set LC on import to automaticaly add them.  

Spindle speed in LC will always refer to how fast the spindle is rotating the tool. In that way it is very specific as whatever the spindle is  ie; chuck, mill head, router, holder, is the source of rotation and can't be confused.
In the case of having a way of controling the speed via Mach, the proper speed is specified and the associated coding is provided in the Gcode.
 
In the Tool Dialogue you specifiy the feedrate and plunge speed. I don't give any specifics or recomendations.
Like ostie said, you need to experimentor find a reliable source for information. For metal cutting these can be calculated, charts used based on experimentation and experience. It can be quite involved.
For wood you want to remove / cut chips and not chunks, not burn the tool or the wood. It also is related to the feedrate ( how fast the cutter is moving into the work ). Even for wood/mdf/partical board it can realy vary depending on the density, grain, etc of the wood. Partical board has some nasty stuff in it and some of the adhesives and stone will do a number on a router bit. Heck, sometimes the is granite / stone in ebony, or some of the exotic woods can actualy be machined. When you manualy use a router you constantly vary the feed based on what you see, so experiment to see what words on your material.

There is a difference between plunging into a material with the face / bottom of the cutter as compared to
using the side of the cutter when feeding.

You should be able to find some generic guidelines  for machining wood on the various web sites that sell machines.

As far as the manual goes and definition of terms.........I was asked to define all the terms but did not. The manual was meant to show the user  how to use the software....i did try to add some machining experience or practical application in it.....but, to define "all "the words.......maybe someday.
But for now, i am done and need a break from it.  ;)

RICH
 

Offline budman68

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2009, 05:47:17 PM »
The users (and future users) of LCam should be sending you a case of beer for the time and effort you put in your manuals, Rich. I don't even use LCam and appreciate all the work you did for those folks-   ;)

Dave
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Just because I'm a Global Moderator, don't assume that I know anything !

Dave->    ;)

Offline kolias

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2009, 06:08:52 PM »
RICH you did a beautiful work on the LC manual but an inexperienced person like me obviously has a lot of questions.

I read the manual and watched the videos a few times each but nothing is better than experience. The replies from you and others in this post answered my questions. I have to experiment to find the rates for my tool and machine.

Yes if you are not a machinist probably you don’t know what pocket or relief means but eventually all will come to light, it always does
Nicolas
Nicolas

Offline RICH

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2009, 06:10:33 PM »
Thanks Dave,
Yep, it took a lot of time. Hopefuly users will have a tool which they don't have to spend a lot of money for and will satisfy basic machining needs. My reward will be in the happy faces of those users who actually spend the time to go thru the manual and are able to do something rather quickly that would have been difficult to do otherwise.
Besides, saves lot of typing when replying to questions.  :D

BTW, Bud gives me a headache ( no pun intended ), but.....a nice cold Yuengling Lager along with a brandy, chips and a dill pickle.....ah priceless!   ;) Must be the coal region influence!  >:D
RICH

Offline budman68

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2009, 06:17:48 PM »


BTW, Bud gives me a headache ( no pun intended ), but.....a nice cold Yuengling Lager along with a brandy, chips and a dill pickle.....ah priceless!   ;) Must be the coal region influence!  >:D
RICH

Funny you mention "Y-Lager" as that has been my keg of choice lately in the last 3 keg changes. It's a great factory tour as well, I highly recommend it  ;)

Dave
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Just because I'm a Global Moderator, don't assume that I know anything !

Dave->    ;)

Offline RICH

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Re: LC Terms
« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2009, 06:57:58 PM »
Nicolas,
I just posted a subject in the Lazycam thread. Feel free to ask any question you have there and eventually the definitions will appear in the manual. I can't anticipate what anybody will ever ask, so, i will rely on the users to just ask.
RICH

BTW, When using LC, always think in machining terms, you are not drawing or inputting values.