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Author Topic: Using a 3 axis router as a lathe - oddball question  (Read 3358 times)

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Offline PatM

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Using a 3 axis router as a lathe - oddball question
« on: April 23, 2009, 07:59:56 PM »
A strange idea popped into my head as I was drifting off to sleep last night. I'd been thinking of making some dollhouse decorations for a 2 year old and wondering how I could turn miniature baluster without a lathe. A picture formed of my router holding a dowel in the 1/4" collet and a tool bolted to the table and the router was moving in two axis to cut the baluster - a vertical lathe where the work moves instead of the tool.

Has anyone ever tried this? I was trying to figure out how to set up my axis to accomplish this but nothing is sticking to my aged neurons. I can't imagine it would be all that difficult to accomplish. Of course, being supported only at one end means long workpieces are verboten but since I only have 5" travel on my Z that temptation is moot 8)

Any ideas?

Offline Hood

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Re: Using a 3 axis router as a lathe - oddball question
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2009, 08:02:26 PM »
Yes, have seen a few do it, just set up a lathe profile and when you want to turn open the lathe profile, when you want to mill open the mill profile.
Hood
Re: Using a 3 axis router as a lathe - oddball question
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2009, 09:48:00 PM »
A strange idea popped into my head as I was drifting off to sleep last night. I'd been thinking of making some dollhouse decorations for a 2 year old and wondering how I could turn miniature baluster without a lathe. A picture formed of my router holding a dowel in the 1/4" collet and a tool bolted to the table and the router was moving in two axis to cut the baluster - a vertical lathe where the work moves instead of the tool.

Has anyone ever tried this? I was trying to figure out how to set up my axis to accomplish this but nothing is sticking to my aged neurons. I can't imagine it would be all that difficult to accomplish. Of course, being supported only at one end means long workpieces are verboten but since I only have 5" travel on my Z that temptation is moot 8)

Any ideas?


I've done exactly that on my knee mill.  I once used it to turn a 12" diameter disc for a disc sander I made.  Works great!

Regards,
Ray L.
Regards,
Ray L.

Offline PatM

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Re: Using a 3 axis router as a lathe - oddball question
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2009, 08:07:00 AM »
Well thats encouraging! So it probably wasn't a dementia inspired idea after all 8)