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Author Topic: ATV part  (Read 8884 times)

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Offline budman68

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Re: ATV part
« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2009, 08:15:16 PM »
It's funny you mentioned the eagle one product as it's basically the same thing as what's called "Never Dull" and it comes in a metal can and is a cotton wading filled with the same polish you're refering to. I believe it's the original too.

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Just because I'm a Global Moderator, don't assume that I know anything !

Dave->    ;)
Re: ATV part
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2009, 12:03:33 PM »
Sam Nice Part.. I was just wondering if you could answer a couple questions....

What cad, and cam program did you use to make this part.

What process did you use when you made the yamaha logo then how did you flip the piece over and have it all line up...

Finally....  How did you 3d model that piece from the original...

I am at the stage of drawing up a 2d piece in Auto Cad. Opening it up in cam then cutting it out...  The 3d stuff or even making the z axis change height during the cut is my next step.. kinda like the U cut in the bottom of the cover..

and by the way my fav. polish is Mothers......


Thanks so much..

Kyley

Offline Sam

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Re: ATV part
« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2009, 01:37:33 PM »
I used mastercam for the cad and the cam.
The logo I modified from the standard one. All the curves are arcs, not segmented splines. I sketched most of it, then cut vertically down the middle of the logo, deleted the remaining unwanted half, then mirrored the half to create the full logo. This insured the logo to be truly uniform, and eliminated most of the dimensioning.
I'm not really clear on what your asking about keeping things lined up. When flipped on the cutting table to cut the reverse side, the screw holes lined everything up. After buffing, the holes are countersunk. This removes any defects caused by the hole during buffing.
I modeled the piece from the original by using a good set of calipers to measure the features on the old part.
Eagle One has some great stuff call nano-polish.

I've used it on parts that are now 2 years old, and they still look good with no corrosion. My only complaint with the wadding type polish is that it gives everything a chrome look, instead of a polished aluminum look. It does do a superb job, though.
"CONFIDENCE: it's the feeling you experience before you fully understand the situation."
Re: ATV part
« Reply #13 on: April 05, 2009, 01:03:40 AM »
OK All you buffers,   ;D Yes , I've done my share of buffing, and it is a dirty job, but somebody has to do it.  :D
I do my buffing with 8" cotton buffs on a 1 hp 3450rpm pedestal grinder. buffing compound , darker the color , the courser the grit.
Black , brown , red , white. I've never seen the blue, Block sanding is a must on flat parts to get out any waves, Start out with courser compound and work your way down , finishing with  the white. Black is more dedicated to stainless which is a real bear.
For your finish hand polish , use blue magic, if you can find it. comes in a tube , or a can. I tried every kind of polish out there including ones mentioned in previous post, and found blue magic did the best job. all the others would leave a slight haze. BLUE MAGIC , did the job.  like chrome

On machined parts , I use a scotchbrite wheel to take out the machining marks first.

P.S. Never heated the parts  , except with the buffing wheels.   :D
And , yes, it can throw parts all over the shop. Stay away from the top edge.

ED
Ed VanEss

Offline Sam

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Re: ATV part
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2009, 03:12:59 AM »
Quote
darker the color , the courser the grit
Good to know info. Thanks.
Blue has no cutting action, and is for use after the white. It's very dry. I always thought green was for stainless. The reason I heat the parts is because... the force required by heating the part with the wheel and compound, always altered the part in some unwanted fashion. So, instead of heat by friction, I use heat by torch after sanding to a fine finish, allowing me to go straight to white, keeping the most detail possible. Try it out sometime, see if it works for you.
Have you tried the flannel buffs? I thought about getting a stone like an Arkansas stone or a fine grit carbide slip stone to see if they would give a good pre-buff finish. Ever heard of doing that Ed? I'll hafta try out the blue magic. http://www.drillspot.com/products/457207/Blue_Magic_500_Metal_Polish_Cream
"CONFIDENCE: it's the feeling you experience before you fully understand the situation."

BClemens

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Re: ATV part
« Reply #15 on: April 05, 2009, 06:39:01 AM »
Steel molds are stoned with fine slip stones and water or light oil to remove tooling marks. Aluminum doesn't work too well with that type of abrasive since it tends to stick. I've done my share of stoning helicopter blade molds for composite construction with pre-preg graphite construction. They must be smoooooth!

A worker in the lay-up shop placing the pre-preg in one of these molds (about 26' long) left a 6 inch steel scale in the mold that was picked up when the finished and cured blade was xrayed for certification. About $80,000 worth of silly mistake.... I believe he is delivering pizza pies now.

Bill C.
Re: ATV part
« Reply #16 on: April 05, 2009, 02:02:44 PM »
Sam ,

By the way, I didn't mention how good your part looks. Excellent job. Sorry, this post changed to buffing procedures.

Some years ago I used to buy a emery paste from a local plating shop. you have to keep it damp in a tube. I kepted it in the fridge.
You put it on a buffing wheel and let dry. It was somewhat like a scotchbrite wheel.
Then theres another where you roll the buff wheel in glue, and then a grit. which was made to hard by the cured glue.
Was ok for roughing. Aluminum foundry used it for pressure cookers which were all buffed on a big lathe. T hey were then finished with the red compound. Now those guys got DIRTY.

Ive also used diamond paste for polished steel dies for the final finish.
I still have a pretty good supply of 1" diameter scotch brite wheels and pads. Used to do porting work on Harley heads.

ED
Ed VanEss