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Author Topic: Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?  (Read 916 times)

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Offline sebba

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Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?
« on: March 27, 2020, 06:20:15 AM »
Hello,

Sorry if this question was covered but I was not able to find the answer...

My question is: which way is better? to leave the button's code in screenset .set file or to save it in .m1s file?
I care about that for a large number of buttons with scripts, not for a few...
Mach3 will run slower if scripts will be saved in .set file? Any improvements if scripts are saved in m1s files?
Screenset loading process is affected, too?

I'm thinking the loading of screenset will be faster if scripts will be saved in m1s files but I don't know if entire application will run faster or not.
Any advice is welcome

Thank you,
Seb
Re: Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2020, 12:06:57 PM »
In addition to that question, is there a speed increase, either theoretical or if anyone has noticed actual increases if you save scripts as .mcc files instead of m1c?
Any machine is a smoke machine if used wrong enough,
Re: Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2020, 03:18:28 PM »
Hi,

Quote
noticed actual increases if you save scripts as .mcc files instead of m1c?

.mcc files are compiles lua chunks and are applicable in Mach4 only.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!

Offline sebba

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Re: Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2020, 03:05:20 AM »
.mcc files are compiles lua chunks and are applicable in Mach4 only.

I am not so sure... I have .mcc files in my Mach3, also (compiled m1s scripts)
Re: Saving Button Script - .set or .m1s?
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2020, 02:39:46 PM »
.mcc files are compiles lua chunks and are applicable in Mach4 only.
Craig

No, the Mach3 editor allows you to save as an M1S ("Basic" text file) or an MCC file.

If you look at the MCC file in a binary editor, it still shows the text of most (all?) of the non-built-in commands, but not the numbers, and not (I think) statements like for(), if etc,.  I assume the numbers are in binary in the same position as in the original, but things like:
Code "G1 x23.5"
are still there, although it looks like it's in unicode.  Again, not sure, I haven't looked further than a cursory glance.

To me it looks like what used to be called "Pre-compiled" code, which is then used by an interpreter to speed the process at runtime.  The question is, does it in fact increase speed in the real world (saving a noticeable amount of time) or is it a hold-over from when machines ran slower, or is it just so vendors can help keep proprietary information secret?

Any machine is a smoke machine if used wrong enough,