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Author Topic: Need help with this drawing for G Code  (Read 3639 times)

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Re: Need help with this drawing for G Code
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2017, 10:38:32 AM »
Thanks guys,

This is  not a real part. I just drew this to teach myself about the issues revolving around radius and offset issues. And secondly, I am trying to set up Mach3 to work in the same manner as a Fagor controller I have on a large machine. Well, to the extent I can. I work at a machine shop that has several Haas and other brands of CNC machines. One thing I learned pretty quick is there is not much in the way of standards when it comes to CNC machines.

Also, no matter where the code is generated, I want to know where the damn cutter is going when I push the Cycle Start button!!...LOL

As for the CAM issue, I have access to Solid Works  and MasterCam. I am only doing all this to actually understand G Code well, and see how Mach3 handles the code.

Thanks for the full stop idea Gary. I assume if one needed to make the part as drawn there should be some way to cut the .625 radius. Perhaps by using tangential moves...not sure.

Thanks,

Billy
Re: Need help with this drawing for G Code
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2017, 11:14:17 AM »
EDIT: Just so you know, six weeks ago I did not know how to spell G Code...LOL I am into a serious learning curve. I am retired and have no need to work and all this is just something that interest me. The machine shop I work at is just a fun place for me to pass time at. Yes, I actually do things there that are useful to the owners, but it is not a real job for me. All the code they run is manually programmed...kinda crazy but it is what it is. I understand trig and geometry well enough to muddle through it so that helps.

A larger issue I am having is the use of I and J. I can make it work some times and at others I get totally lost!!...LOL It is a critical part of learning G Code, especially if one need to do much mirroring. The quadrant issues are required understanding to make all this work. Well...poco a poco as we say here in Miami. 

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Re: Need help with this drawing for G Code
« Reply #12 on: January 07, 2018, 03:21:54 PM »
The safest thing is to put a very tiny rad on the end of any sharp point that way the tool has a clearly defined outside path, the rad can be .001" or even less but it forces the comp to stay on the same side of the line.
Without engineers the world stops
Re: Need help with this drawing for G Code
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2018, 05:36:36 PM »
EDIT: Just so you know, six weeks ago I did not know how to spell G Code...LOL I am into a serious learning curve. I am retired and have no need to work and all this is just something that interest me. The machine shop I work at is just a fun place for me to pass time at. Yes, I actually do things there that are useful to the owners, but it is not a real job for me. All the code they run is manually programmed...kinda crazy but it is what it is. I understand trig and geometry well enough to muddle through it so that helps.

A larger issue I am having is the use of I and J. I can make it work some times and at others I get totally lost!!...LOL It is a critical part of learning G Code, especially if one need to do much mirroring. The quadrant issues are required understanding to make all this work. Well...poco a poco as we say here in Miami. 

Any shop doing all manual programming in this day is just plain stupid. I've done lots of manual programming and the operators thought I was really good it at.  However you can't make money programming for hours when even a HOBBY Cam program can blow your doors off.  We do really simple parts for our own products.  We use a hobby grade program called CamBam.  40 Sessions for free, $150 to buy perpetual license with upgrades.  We use it do internal and external tapered pipe threads, 3D machined nozzles for our plastic welding guns, 3D machined housings for the bottom of a strainer, used the mill as a lathe to cut a large diameter gasket mold and ground the tools for that task, modified a stainless pump housing, engrave nameplates with text and our logo, circular mill tapered flanges for valves.

There really is NO excuse to waste money manual programming everything.
Re: Need help with this drawing for G Code
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2018, 11:40:51 AM »
Hi Gary,

I agree with you about using a CAM program. Why things are done in this shop manually is beyond my understanding. But like I said "it is what it is".

Technology in every field is advancing. I have a very well designed autopilot in my airplane. The autopilot can fly the plane with greater precision than I can hand fly the plane, until it fails.... At that point I have the requirement to fly the plane manually, well, or crash the plane and die!!...lol

It is unlikely that "crashing" a CNC machine is going to get anyone killed or seriously injured. I do think it is prudent for a machine operator to understand the code being being generated by what ever method.

The more complex the part the greater the need for high quality CAD/CAM software. In fact, the part does not have to be very complex for it to be impossible to machine by hand and next to impossible to program manually.  Software exist that does a very good job at  complex part making. That same software is not very easy to use to do simple things. Solid Works and Master CAM come to mind.

I have no desire to plow "my" garden with a water buffalo but they are in constant use in many parts of the world and to this day produce millions of tons of food.

Sometimes businesses do well in spite of their lack of ability to adopt best practices and modern methods.

Cheers,

Billy