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Author Topic: Cutting smaller  (Read 5965 times)

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Offline RICH

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2016, 09:15:46 AM »
As suggested check the steps per unit / calibrate the axes and use the new values for steps per unit.

That should be done "anytime" one changes or adjusts any electronic or mechanical part of the system.

RICH
Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2016, 09:28:19 AM »
Resistors are used to regulate the amount of amps to a motor from 0 to 7 amps in my case I needed to supply 5.5 to 6 amps.
The resister used was 270K.

Bill I
Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2016, 09:35:02 AM »
Hi Rich

That was the first thing that was done after installing the new controller and has been re calibrated several times since with no change in steps per inch.

Offline RICH

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2016, 09:41:12 AM »
How much run out on the spindle and how much backlash.
BTW, you have spindle runout and backlash it's just a matter of degree.

RICH

Offline RICH

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2016, 10:24:58 AM »
Doing a check out of the "SYSTEM" to find just what is causing an accuracy problem requires a methodical
approach. Yes you do the obvious to start. I like to put what i am looking for into perspective.

So the easy things are done, but, always with the thought that simple things are related to other factors.

MDF, wood, plastic is not exactly a true medium to check tool cutting, different materials, etc all come into play.
Heck, the tooling marks left in the surface can be worth 1 or 2 thou.
 
Electronics is hard to check as most will not have the equipment to do so. Also simple mechanical
items can be difficult to check. ie; Belt tension can have an affect on the axis motion, is usualy
small amount in terms of steps, same goes for a timing gear, but they are repeatable per revolution
and a bear to isolate components of the system. another simple example is a coupling, other than a solid
coupling,it can affect the motion also depending on applied torque, age, etc.

ALways remember this: What am I measuring and it it the same as the basis!

Just some things to consider before you even start to question what is wrong as compared to before!


RICH

Offline Davek0974

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #25 on: September 26, 2016, 10:58:28 AM »

MDF, wood, plastic is not exactly a true medium to check tool cutting, different materials, etc all come into play.
Heck, the tooling marks left in the surface can be worth 1 or 2 thou.
 
RICH

Exactly what i said earlier, 4thou on MDF, I would be happy to hit that on aluminium :)
Could be a slightly different ground cutter, is it new, has it been verified to be an exact dimension tool?
These are very tight tolerances for MDF, what measuring tool is used, vernier, mic, etc?
Bridgeport Mill, Mach3 V062, CSMIO-IP/A controller, AC Servo Drives.
Plasma table, Mach3 V062, Step motors, C&CNC THC.

Offline RICH

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #26 on: September 26, 2016, 03:42:23 PM »
Just machine current  material using different  feeds, speeds, rough and finish and if not cutting correctly than adjust cutter diameter  in CAD or MACH.

Some of the exotic woods machine like metal, some metals machine poorly, but if not what you want adjust accordingly.
I can get different results depending on how and what tool is used.

In fact, I can really screw something up if a re-ground is used and not accounted for.

RICH

BTW Dave,
Quote
I would be happy to hit that on aluminium

That's why files and sandpaper were invented and still used today!  ;D  :D


Offline Davek0974

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #27 on: September 26, 2016, 04:06:45 PM »
Of course :)

Bridgeport Mill, Mach3 V062, CSMIO-IP/A controller, AC Servo Drives.
Plasma table, Mach3 V062, Step motors, C&CNC THC.
Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #28 on: October 13, 2016, 08:28:15 AM »
problem resolved
Thanks

Offline Davek0974

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Re: Cutting smaller
« Reply #29 on: October 13, 2016, 08:30:26 AM »
well don't keep us in suspense......
Bridgeport Mill, Mach3 V062, CSMIO-IP/A controller, AC Servo Drives.
Plasma table, Mach3 V062, Step motors, C&CNC THC.