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Author Topic: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?  (Read 13482 times)

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #30 on: June 23, 2014, 03:34:59 PM »
Drill press time! Get a subland drill from McMaster Carr or other supplier and knock it out.

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2014, 07:13:50 PM »
Nah I don't have a drill press. I'm doing 4 holes at a time

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #32 on: June 27, 2014, 05:20:57 AM »
Well it still took me near 3 hours and had 4 programs

I was able to do 4 outer holes ( drill path then 3/4" cutter drill path ) on each outer dour holes. I used a block in between with a hole to pin off a locator hole . The came back after wards and drilled and counter bored the last hole .

lessons learned on this job. Order form in place . Then the guy had the nerve to come pick them up with no money  another new fuel in place no payment no chips made

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #33 on: June 27, 2014, 05:22:00 AM »
Now here is a question. Is it worth the time of hooking up an automatic tool setter ?

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #34 on: June 27, 2014, 10:17:12 AM »
That's a question only you can answer. Depending on how you measure your tools, it may save a lot of time.

On my router, I use an auto zero system with two touch plates. One that I place on the workpiece to set Z zero, and a fixed plate away from the work that is set as a reference position. When setting Z zero, Mach3 will touch the plate on the workpiece, then go to the fixed plate, and save it's location relative to Z zero.
When there is a tool change, I change the tool, and my M6 macros send it to the fixed plate, which sets the tool to Z zero.
With this method, you don't need to use the tool table, or use G43 length offsets. You never need to know the length of the tool, as everything is done automatically.

This may not be for everyone. If you do a lot of tool changes, and have your tools pre-measured in holders, then the tool table and G43 may be a lot faster.
Gerry

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http://www.g-forcecnc.com/jointcam.html

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Re: Why does Mach 3 need a tool length?
« Reply #35 on: June 27, 2014, 10:19:51 AM »
Thanks for the input