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Author Topic: Importing G code  (Read 4334 times)

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Re: Importing G code
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2011, 08:50:20 PM »
I'd say you have to do as you said in your first post.
The ORIGIN needs to be closer to, or on the profile.
If you draw a 1" dia. circle and have the 0,0 origin 5' away, you'll get what you are seeing.
From my limited experience,
Russ
Re: Importing G code
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2011, 08:52:38 PM »
Just be sure to define the 0,0 origin every time you use the CAM.....never have to go back then.

Offline rickw

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Re: Importing G code
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2011, 09:40:46 PM »
Okay, I get it now. I am trying to figure out the zeroing part. Can one zero on a certain point on the material you are cutting? I have a piece of stock not much bigger that what I want to cut. Can I zero in a certain mark on the stock to ensure the positioning? Can I zero on this mark and expect it to be 0,0 on the work offset?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2011, 09:46:40 PM by rickw »
Re: Importing G code
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2011, 10:28:01 PM »
Yes, exactly right on all accounts.
It can be anywhere you wish. On the part or on the fixture or anywhere you like.
Just be sure to define it.

Offline ger21

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Re: Importing G code
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2011, 10:34:17 PM »
Ideally, you should be drawing your parts in AutoCAD in the positions you want to cut them, relative to the origin.
Gerry

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Offline rickw

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Re: Importing G code
« Reply #15 on: February 07, 2011, 09:35:33 AM »
Thanks Jerry, now I know I need to be aware of this when drafting and editing.