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Author Topic: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.  (Read 17787 times)

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Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #10 on: January 17, 2011, 06:43:28 AM »
LB,

I think that Cut3D would be great if you are going to want to produce 2.5D or 3D models.

Tweakie.

Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.

Offline LB

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Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2011, 07:30:02 AM »
Hi Tweakie,

That is what I thought.  But, I wanted someones professional opinion.

Thanks for the reply.

LB
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2011, 09:16:25 AM »
Hi,

My company is going to purchase Vectric Cut2D.  Would it be wise to bundle our package and get the Cut2D and Cut3D?   What would be the big advantage to Cut3D?  The difference in price is $250.00.

TIA for any information.

LB

Cut2D does not have a lead in/out feature, which makes it virtually useless for contouring, unless you're OK with start and stop divits.  Doesn't make much sens as they advertise the software for contouring.  Sheetcam is a much better option.  It is far more flexible than Cut2D.
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2011, 09:42:49 AM »

I will say tho, that CorelDRAW is so much easier to use than BobCad V21 for drawing out the plans.



Corel is a graphic arts program, not a CAD program.  You can jump through some hoops to get an acceptable DXF output but personally, I find it much easier to just use the right tool for the job.  I have AutoCAD, Rhino, Corel and Illustrator.  My order of preference for CAD drawing would be Rhino, AutoCAD and finally (reluctantly) Illustrator.  Notice I didn't mention Corel.  I despise Corel.  The only reason I have it is so that if someone sends me a Corel file that won't import into anything else, I can open it and export it as something that will.  i think I've used it twice in three years.

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2011, 08:03:22 AM »
Quote
Cut2D does not have a lead in/out feature, which makes it virtually useless for contouring, unless you're OK with start and stop divits.  Doesn't make much sens as they advertise the software for contouring.  Sheetcam is a much better option.  It is far more flexible than Cut2D.

I agree and think SheetCam is a much better option here but to be fair Cut2D does have a 'ramp plunge' option which does prevent 'divits' (assuming you have a machine with minimal to zero backlash of course).

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #15 on: January 18, 2011, 08:51:50 AM »
Quote
Cut2D does not have a lead in/out feature, which makes it virtually useless for contouring, unless you're OK with start and stop divits.  Doesn't make much sens as they advertise the software for contouring.  Sheetcam is a much better option.  It is far more flexible than Cut2D.

I agree and think SheetCam is a much better option here but to be fair Cut2D does have a 'ramp plunge' option which does prevent 'divits' (assuming you have a machine with minimal to zero backlash of course).

Tweakie.

Depends on what you're using it for.  I think most people who have a CNC router have more in mind for their machine than just simple contouring.  The only machine that is really made JUST for contouring is plasma, laser or waterjet and those operation require a lead in/out.  Ramp plunge won't do anything there.  I think Cut2D is basically a low priced "get-you-in-the-door" program to make new router users realize they need more.  If they added lead in/out capability, they would probably develop a loyal plasma user group.

I also tried it for contouring MDF on a router and while ramp plunge was better than a straight plunge, the entry/exits were not as clean as a arc ramp in/out.

IMO, if you need 2D profiling and pocketing only, go with Sheetcam.  It's more powerful and cheaper than Cut2D.  If you need 3D feature machining and v-carving go with V-Carve Pro.  V-Carve Pro is basically ArtCAM Pro at a fraction the cost.  I can't figure out how they were able to knock off ArtCAM so closely without raising some eyebrows unless (1) Vectric was formed as a "low end" division of ArtCAM as to not devalue their premier product or (2) The guys at Vectric had some ownership in ArtCAM and were able to leave and take their ideas with them without a non-compete.
 

Offline Tweakie.CNC

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Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2011, 11:07:08 AM »
Ahh plasma - I do not recall plasma being mentioned in this thread, come to think of it I don't recall Cut2D ever being advertised as being suitable for plasma either - certainly not by Vectric. But I can see that 'ramp plunge' is totally useless for plasma work compared with 'lead in'.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2011, 12:26:14 PM »
My 1st point was that the only folks who ever really need 2D contouring exclusively are plasma users.  It doesn't take long for a router user to realize that their machine can do a whole lot more than just cut 2D contours.   You're right, Vectric does not advertise Cut2D for plasma.  In fact, they will tell you that it's not suitable for plasma at all when the only thing needed to make it suitable is a lead in/out function.  My 2nd point was that if they did add lead in/out they would sell more copies to plasma users than router users.

I'm not bashing them.  I like their software and was very disappointed that I couldn't use it.  I understand from a marketing perspective why Leads are not included in Cut2D, but really, this is a basic function when it comes to contouring.
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2011, 12:45:58 PM »
I have Corel Draw and I used it briefly for parts designs.  It worked ok, but was limited to .001 precision.  It rounded numbers with a higher precision than that.  For most parts cutting at a precision of .001 is more than adequate, but the problem I found with design was that the error could be cumulative will moving, copying, centering, and other manipulation of drawing elements. 

Now if I could set it (or if I can somebody would tell me how) to about 6 digits of precision while drawing that would be fine.  My machine when freshly adjusted only does about .001 precision and .0005 repeatability anyway. 





Yes.

I have not used Cut2D but from what I see on their website it has more features then SheetCAM. Seems like downloading the free trial would be the next step.  :)

It would be interesting to see how well it handles a dxf file created by Corel without the DXFTool. Don't know if you have Corel but if so I would try that before buying the DXFTool.

Just some personal thoughts on CorelDRAW. I use it because we run a printing business as well as a machine shop and have used Corel since version 3 so I am very familiar with it. For graphics work making things like signs and especially for projects with text it's great. However for machining projects that require a high degree of precision I find AutoCAD is a better choice.

Kerry
Re: Mach 3 and CorelDRAW.
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2011, 01:01:41 PM »
Hi Bob,

I've never checked the accuracy, but if you go to Tools/Options/Workspace/Edit you can change the precision.

If you check it out let us know if it really makes a difference.