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Author Topic: steps per calculation (Help with)  (Read 34084 times)

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Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2018, 02:56:36 PM »
The calculator should get you going but its easy enough to work out yourself.
10 TPI screw would equal a metric pitch of 25.4/10 =2.54mm

So to calc it will depend on what stepping the dip switch on the drive is set to but we will say 8 for this calc

200 steps for motor, multiplied by 8 microsteps for drive =1,600 per motor rev, assuming no gearing between motors and screw the pulses needed to turn the scrw one rev would be the same. So one rev of the screw moves the axis 2.54mm and it takes 1,600 pulses to do that so 1,600/2.54 is 629.92125965 which is the amount of pulses (steps) required per unit (mm in this case)


Hood



sorry for asking but im nwe in this and i want to learn, how to get the info if my machine doesnt have leadscrew, my machine have rack and pinion and a reducer gear box, how do i get the tpi or the number to get my math going? in order to use the calculator.

Thanks for the time
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2018, 03:01:58 PM »
Hi,
you'll need the following:
1) the pitch of the rack
2) the reduction ratio of the geabox
3) the bely reduction from the stepper to the gearbox, if there is one.
4) the microstepping you are applying.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2018, 03:07:37 PM »
thanks a lot for your fast reply, let me confirm that dsta and ill let you know,the ratio im still confirmthat and the driver is leadshine driver im searching for the model so i can know the microstepping

sorry for this but pith of the track do you mean the number of teeth in an inch in the rack right? and what do you mean with bely redution? if my reducer gear box have a belt? or something.

Again sorry for the question, i just want it to learn more abouth this.
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2018, 03:43:13 PM »
Hi,
with most drivers you decide what microstepping you want and apply it by flicking Dip switches on the drive. About 8 or 16 microsteps is about right, that means
that it would take 1600 or 3200 pulses to cause the stepper to rotate one complete revolution.

The pitch of the rack is exactly that, so many teeth per inch or 1.5mm between teeth some such measurement.

If the stepper is hooked direct to the input shaft of the gearbox then don't worry about the belt reduction, you don't have it.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2018, 03:48:15 PM »
Thanks again, let me confirm the data of what you told me and i will post it here but again thanks for the fast reply.
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2018, 04:27:03 PM »
may i ask you another question, if my machine is in metric, the tpi need to be divided in 25.4 in order to get the tpi in metric right? so if i get 2540 tpi will be 100 mm steps per in metric, am i correct?

Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2018, 04:40:39 PM »
Hi,
may I suggest that you get the most accurate data you can and we can convert that to whatever is needed thereafter.

For instance you may have a manufacturers specification, say  8 teeth per inch, or maybe a pitch of 2.34mm or whatever. If its manufacturer supplied it is likely
accurate and prevents you making a measurement error.

In absence of manufacturers information you are going to have to measure it.

I would suggest taking a marker and marking the tip of a tooth. Then count ten 'gaps' and mark the tip of the tooth that bounds those ten gaps. Then measure
the distance between the marked teeth. The pitch will be (distance in mm)/10.5

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!
Re: steps per calculation (Help with)
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2018, 04:48:31 PM »
Hi,
tpi, or threads (or teeth) per inch was and still is a common way to specify threads and gears in inch units.

The norm in metric units is pitch, which is the distance between adjacent threads.

Both are a measure of the same thing but expressed in exactly opposite ways and causes a lot of confusion.

Imperial:  number of features in a given distance
Metric:     distance between adjacent features

I'm happy with either but what is important is that it be accurate.

Craig
My wife left with my best friend...
     and I miss him!