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Author Topic: Tube/pipe coping or notching  (Read 15823 times)

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Offline BR549

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2010, 07:16:22 PM »
I got with Les at Sheetcam and he had a POST that will convert the Y axis to Axis moves. SO if the pipefitter package could put out a DXF profile without all the other stuff added in then it could be

Pipefitter-dxf >>>> Sheetcam >>>>>>> Mach.

Closer, (;-) TP

Offline BR549

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2010, 07:18:48 PM »
I got with Les at Sheetcam and he had a POST that will convert the Y axis to Axis moves. SO if the pipefitter package could put out a DXF profile without all the other stuff added in then it could be

Pipefitter-dxf >>>> Sheetcam >>>>>>> Mach.

AND IF pipefitter could be made into a plugin to SheetCam then it would be a NICE package.

Closer, (;-) TP

Offline mckoz

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2010, 07:20:24 PM »
That is closer!  I sent their main email address a query and directed them to this thread - it will be interesting to see if they respond...

Offline mckoz

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2010, 03:11:19 PM »
TP:  Well, bad news and some "I don't know" news.  The developer, Stan, of the Dig Pipe Fitter program can't do anything because of some non-competes.   He did offer this bit of information, and I thought based on your experience it might be worth testing:


"There is a DXF export of the template itself.  No toolpath offset is available.  That DXF file is intended for documentation but once you have the polyline from the DXF file you could manipulate it as you wish.
Please go ahead and download Digital Pipe Fitter from the website.  It will even print and export DXF files in a limited way to let you test your workflow. To print or export a DXF from an unlicensed installation: use the Branch Joint and set the branch angle to 53deg.  Export to DXF is under the print menu item."

What do you think?

David

Offline BR549

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #14 on: October 28, 2010, 06:17:59 PM »
David I already tested all of that (;-) I knew it worked. I was just trying to trim down the total number of steps to get a simple coped joint ready to cut.

The DXF has a LOT of extra stuff on the drawing that you have to clean up then you can CAM it and produce a cut file that can be used on a 4th axis plasma.

(;-) TP

Offline mckoz

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2010, 06:29:07 PM »
Figures.  Too many steps make it hard to justify.  Oh well, I'll keep looking, maybe somebody will have an "in cnc" solution down the road.

Offline BR549

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #16 on: October 28, 2010, 06:48:56 PM »
A wizard COULD be done IF one was really good with all the math involved to calculate the profile based on selected profiles and sizes.

I'll keep a eye out for a solution for you.

(;-) TP

Offline mckoz

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #17 on: October 28, 2010, 06:49:54 PM »
Thanks !

Offline BR549

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Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2010, 12:03:54 AM »
Looking at the math (which is  way over my head(;-) ) It may be possible to do this as a Macro with a programable front end. You would input P1 diam P2 diam and cut angle.  THen Mach would convert the Yaxis to Aaxis code and run the parametric gcode and cut the profile.

Maybe, IF I can decipher the math.

(;-) TP
Re: Tube/pipe coping or notching
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2010, 06:19:56 PM »
Hello All:
This is an intriguing problem. I believe it may lend itself to a simpler solution, but not as visual as a CAM program. If you slice a tube at a given angle, the line at the tube surface is a path in X, (the long axis of the tube) and angle A, the corresponding point as the tube rotates. This is assuming that the tool/spindle centerline, or the plasma torch remains over the tube centerline, Y, as the tube rotates. Therefore, a series of point pairs, X,A will drive the machine along this path. Furthermore, each 90 degrees of rotation is a mirror image of the previous 90 degrees. This path can be calculated in Excell. I can expound on this further, if interested.

Regards,
John