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Author Topic: quilting or embroidery machine  (Read 16592 times)

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Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2011, 12:17:30 PM »
Anybody got a schematic for connecting a solid state relay to control the coolant pump?

Larry
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2011, 01:36:19 AM »
I think a sharp needle is a tool to be respected, my boss's wife has a Berninna  sewing machine that you can load a dxf file and it halls ass.
I would call it Tool No. 1. She embroid. Me a triumph jacket and it was awesome!!!
Proper Planning Prevents Piss Poor Perfomance
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #22 on: August 12, 2012, 08:51:08 AM »
Hi all, I am back! And with another brain teaser of a question.  Can anyone tell me how I would reverse a pattern at the end of it's run so that the travel is in the opposite direction, and also, how would one set up Mach3 to restart at a given location to finish a pattern that has been interrupted?

Larry
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #23 on: August 12, 2012, 10:28:13 AM »
Hi Larry L

I guess this is the broken thread problem; after the thread breaks there is a delay before the machine stops, leaving an unstitched section. Once the machine is rethreaded you want to back up along the stitch path manually, without sewing and the needle up until you reach the place where the machine stopped sewing then a little further back, an inch or so to lock off the loose end. The program can then complete automatically.

Commercial machines have a reverse button for this....

There is a reposition button in addition to the reverse button.

You may also have to move the machine head to an accessibile position, some quilting machine frames are very large Say 4 x 5 metres making it impossible to thread the machine if the sewing head is in the middle of the quilt. Commercial machines allow you to move the head to the side with X,Y buttons while remembering the last position where the stitching stopped.

The sequence in this situation is move to the side, rethread, reposition, then back up to the last stitched line and a little more to lock it off.

Can it be done easily with Mach 3?

Cheers
John

« Last Edit: August 12, 2012, 10:38:30 AM by John Mac »
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #24 on: August 12, 2012, 04:04:57 PM »
Hi Larry L

I guess this is the broken thread problem; after the thread breaks there is a delay before the machine stops, leaving an unstitched section. Once the machine is rethreaded you want to back up along the stitch path manually, without sewing and the needle up until you reach the place where the machine stopped sewing then a little further back, an inch or so to lock off the loose end. The program can then complete automatically.

Commercial machines have a reverse button for this....

There is a reposition button in addition to the reverse button.

You may also have to move the machine head to an accessibile position, some quilting machine frames are very large Say 4 x 5 metres making it impossible to thread the machine if the sewing head is in the middle of the quilt. Commercial machines allow you to move the head to the side with X,Y buttons while remembering the last position where the stitching stopped.

The sequence in this situation is move to the side, rethread, reposition, then back up to the last stitched line and a little more to lock it off.

Can it be done easily with Mach 3?

Cheers
John

Hi John,

Thanks for responding to my inquiry.  I believe you are right about the repositioning of the sewing head.  It is necessary to move the head when rethreading.  However, the problem is that at this time Mach3 doesn't have a feature/button/function to allow this.  The real problem is that continuation of the stitching from the point of breakage or a bit back from that point is not  a normal function of the program at this time.  That is why I asked the question.  If some one can give me information on how to re-start the stitching as if it had never started, then I will be able to program that into the software or pattern.  Mach3 is a very capable piece of software that I have been using for about two years now, and I am extremely pleased with it's function.  I can't see changing to any other software.  The ability to change functions and to control the software any way you want to is absolutely amazing.  Art did a good thing writing the software.


Larry
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2012, 03:09:26 PM »
Tweakie,

A question for you based on the answer you gave above about using OEM code 1005.  How would you setup to detect the break of the optical switch?  Using say rockcliff 4 port board.  would you connect it to the inputs of the board?  and maybe set the mach3 settings to the specific ports on the board?  Got any ideas?  This could be a good thing for the quilters out there that are using their own designs.  I for one would love to have such a feature on my quilter.  I was also thinking that the pause should also activate the E-switch function for safety sake.

Larry

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Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2012, 02:27:13 AM »
Hi Larry,

A very theoretical answer…..

Assuming you could find (or create) a point where the thread is under (more or less) constant tension then it would be possible to sense a break using an optical switch. The output of the optical switch (normally open or normally closed, depending on type or how it’s output is biased) could then be fed into a Mach Input (via your 4 port board) and trigger an event in a similar way that a limit switch halts motion.

Yes, you would have to include some form of safety stop feature before hands were placed within the danger zone but you don’t want to loose position so this has to be carefully thought out. A ‘Feed-Hold’ followed by ‘Stop’ will enable position to be maintained but the only real ‘safe condition’ disconnects all power to the machine (loosing any current stepper motor micro-steps on restoration of power). It all depends on the level of safety you consider is required after fully assessing the potential risk to your well being.  ;)

Tweakie.
Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.  Winston Churchill.
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2012, 02:53:52 AM »
Hi Tweakie

Go back to page 2 this thread (Last post)

The catch is sensing the thread (with an opto or mechanical switch) has to be done in the area after the thread tensioner. A switch does not work well there (I know having had a quilting machine for many years) what does work is checking if the thread is moving. that can be done before the thread tensioner. See the note mentioned above.

Cheers
John McNamara
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2012, 12:41:11 PM »
Hi All,

You guys have posted some good brain teasers based on my questions, so I am going to throw another one out and see what comes back.  Does Mach3 have the ability to back up on a pattern and start from a point before and interrupt?  Say for example I want to back along the present pattern being worked on, after I have a thread breakage, and I want to restart the sewing in order to continue the pattern.  This is a good feature that I believe could be incorporated into Mach3.  I would depend upon your input to design this feature.  What do you think?

Larry
Re: quilting or embroidery machine
« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2012, 07:35:19 PM »
Hi All

Good idea if cannot already be done.

There are no doubt other industrial processes where you may have to retrace your steps. Oxy cutting after a flame out for instance?

Or a tool breaks or just chips, they sometimes fail and you have to replace it.

Cheers

Macka