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Author Topic: Turn Eccentric Wizard  (Read 10400 times)

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #20 on: March 31, 2010, 03:31:08 PM »
Having thought about it for a bit, that ony gives you an offset arc not an eccentric circle!!

Offline Dan13

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #21 on: March 31, 2010, 04:01:40 PM »
Looks to me like the Mazak has a Y axis unless its just an optical illusion.
Hood

It certainly has a Y axis, doesn't look like an illusion because the tool remains in contact (centre line) of the work. Any ideas how the gcode was made?

Daniel

Offline Hood

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #22 on: March 31, 2010, 04:34:44 PM »
Any ideas how the gcode was made?

Daniel

Guy says he wrote a home made macro.
Hood

Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2010, 06:16:06 PM »
The code is the easy bit the hard bit is getting a machine that can follow the code instructions,  you need the X or Y axis to be in sync with the spindle.  Then the code is generated using Sin and Cos of a selected arc length on a offset centre point, the Z movement is then divided into the number of cords.

If you make the conforming machine I will write you the code.

Graham
« Last Edit: March 31, 2010, 06:18:06 PM by Graham Waterworth »
Without engineers the world stops

Offline Dan13

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #24 on: April 01, 2010, 01:57:09 AM »
The code is the easy bit the hard bit is getting a machine that can follow the code instructions,  you need the X or Y axis to be in sync with the spindle. 

Don't they both need to be in sync... but then from the nature of how Mach works, if you get one in sync, the other would be automatically in sync.

Then the code is generated using Sin and Cos of a selected arc length on a offset centre point, the Z movement is then divided into the number of cords.

If I see right, the part cut in the video is a square. I think using the method you suggest would cut a circle...?

If you make the conforming machine I will write you the code.

Ha..ha... thanks Graham. As you say it's the machine that is the hardest part, but I will remember your offer if I ever build/buy one ;)

Daniel
Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #25 on: April 01, 2010, 03:06:32 AM »
I'm not sure yuo do need an Y axis, in that video the indeed use it, however in this video it is not used


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gX75gaAcWWA&feature=related

also it mentiones gibscam as the cam generator...

Still the machine axis sync seems to me the hardest thing to solve, stepper drive will be so slow that cutting speeds will be to low
, unless you have fitted servos

I do like the of center clamp insert though...

Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #26 on: April 01, 2010, 03:59:20 AM »
This is why you need a Y axis

Graham
Without engineers the world stops

Offline Graham Waterworth

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #27 on: April 01, 2010, 04:10:52 AM »
Daniel,

If I was cutting a square on and eccentric peg then I would use the chuck as a rotary indexer and mill the flats, why make life hard  :D

But the square code is doable too.

Graham
Without engineers the world stops

Offline Dan13

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Re: Turn Eccentric Wizard
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2010, 08:25:50 AM »
Agree with you, Graham.

Just curious how would look the code for a square? Looks like it's Sin and Cos minus some product of them with some relative parameter...?

Daniel