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Author Topic: recommended feed/plunge speeds  (Read 4093 times)

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Offline BarryB

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recommended feed/plunge speeds
« on: January 18, 2010, 11:14:12 PM »
Hello, I've got some questions on feedrates, plunge and spindle speeds.  I'm very new at this, so I've been running tests way too slowly for my tastes.

For my first pieces, I'm using wood panels out of hard maple.  They are 203mm x 203mm x 45mm.  I've currently been testing with a feed rate of 90mm, and plunge of 30mm.  It seems really slow, but I'm not experience enough to say for sure that it is.

Also, the bit I'm using is a flat, 2 flute carbide.  The fluting is 25mm, and I've been mounting it so there is an additional 10mm exposed from the nut.  Which brings me to my next question, how much of the bit do you put in the the collet?  Mine probably doesn't go all the way to the back of it, it's leaving about 10 mm from the back.  Is it better to just buy a longer bit?

Oh, the spindle speed is about 12000 rpm too.

Barry

Offline Sam

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Re: recommended feed/plunge speeds
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2010, 12:29:19 AM »
Moved your topic from show and tell, to the correct forum section.
Generally, it's best to keep the bits as short as possible. This makes them more rigid. Collets usually don't need to use the entire depth to clamp on the tool.
"CONFIDENCE: it's the feeling you experience before you fully understand the situation."

Offline Chaoticone

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Re: recommended feed/plunge speeds
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2010, 01:17:16 AM »
Barry, I have never seen a chart or formula for cutting wood. The best advise I ever heard was to increase the feedrate in small steps until it breaks a bit then back off 10% for max. tool life. It will cost you a few tools to get a feel using this method but it's the best I know of for wood. I have seen bits run for a very long time useing this. If you running woodbase materials with a lot of resin you deffinatley want Carbide. MDF will ruin HSS quick as a wink. You can also get downcut spiral that helps keeps the material from lifting off the table. Also combination up-cut and down-cut in the same cutter. Those are great for materials where edge chipping is a problem like Melamine. Melamine is usualy partical board with a thin laminate on both sides. There are links in the links section for some good suppliers.

Brett
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Offline BarryB

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Re: recommended feed/plunge speeds
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2010, 10:37:59 AM »
thanks for the advice.  I've broken a bit already but that was me not checking the generated toolpath before trying to cut;)  Now I know to check to make sure I said for the fast jog to be above the stock.

Barry

Offline bowber

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Re: recommended feed/plunge speeds
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2010, 02:17:46 PM »
Maybe not too much help but I've been doing sycamore with a 6mm single flute ITC carbide cutter at around 16000 rpm and 800mm\min, 3mm deep cut. Was cutting for around 1 hour and showed no signs of wear.
Also worked the same in Horse chestnut.
I'm not saying this is the best cutter as it's one I have for plastics so I just used it anyway.
I also used the same feeds for V Carving lettering and this was going the full depth of a 12mm 90degree V bit.

My router is nothing special and is home built with an 800watt router head.

Steve

P.S. plunge was 200mm/min
« Last Edit: January 19, 2010, 02:20:25 PM by bowber »

Offline ftec

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Re: recommended feed/plunge speeds
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2010, 05:24:40 PM »
Barry, check these articles:

http://www.precisebits.com/library.htm

The depth settings rings described there are one way to go, specially if you don't have an automatic tool changer.