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Author Topic: Rotating work offsets around Y  (Read 8024 times)

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Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2009, 04:26:16 PM »
Sorry, I misread what you originally said.  I thought your table axis was parallel to Y.  One way to go (which eats into the Z travel) would be to use a plate like you showed in your last photo as a subplate.  Use countersunk screws to bolt it to the Taig table so the top surface is flush.  Make a second plate that bolts to the rotary axis base but doesn't extend past the rotary table itself.  Make it (and obviously the "sub-base") wide enough that you can put screws to mount it to the sub-base that straddle the rotary table, outboards just far enough to get a ball-end Allen wrench on.  I used a similar setup to mount two THK actuators carriage-to-carriage--"sub-plate" bolted to one carriage and second plate bolted to the other, then screwed together with "overhung" screws.

Randy
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 05:02:41 PM by zephyr9900 »
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #11 on: September 13, 2009, 04:30:04 PM »
This is an application where formulas would actrually work pretty well, since the transform is pretty simple, especially if the misalignment is only in one axis.  For example, if the part is tilted down by 0.010"/inch as you move in Y-, you just add a formula for Z that is a linear function of Y (assuming your Z=0 is set at Y=0):

F(x) = x
F(y) = y
F(z) = Z + (0.010 * Y)

Though you're still FAR better off simply getting the thing trued up to begin with....

Regards,
Ray L.
Regards,
Ray L.
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #12 on: September 13, 2009, 04:36:21 PM »
Ray, are you saying that Mach can do that in realtime while interpreting a gcode file?

Randy

vmax549

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Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #13 on: September 13, 2009, 04:46:06 PM »
YES it can do that, BUT it still going to be a long process to get it aligned via software. You will have to calculate and change the corrections EVERY time you remount the Axis.

WHat is needed is to set the axis square using dowel pins to align it with X axis and surface the bottom of the rotary so it is square to the table. That way it remounts exactly where it should be every time.

SIDENOTE:  You are entering a totally unsupported area of MACH make note that there may be little to NO help available.



(;-) TP
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 04:52:35 PM by vmax549 »
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #14 on: September 13, 2009, 05:00:28 PM »
Oh, I would never go that software route myself (I don't even have a rotary table)--I was just wondering about (and now impressed at!) the capability of Mach doing that on the fly.

Randy
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2009, 05:05:16 PM »
Ray, are you saying that Mach can do that in realtime while interpreting a gcode file?

Randy


Randy,

Yes, it can.  And for simple transforms like that, it'll make no detectable difference in performance.

Regards,
Ray L.
Regards,
Ray L.
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2009, 05:21:35 PM »
You could mount the head on a fixture plate like the one I draw in SolidWorks and you could adjust it with the set screw, do it once and it will still be adjusted the next time you mount it.

Jeff

vmax549

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Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2009, 05:25:46 PM »
THere you go make a subplate to mount the rotary square. THen leave it mounted to the table.

Good idea, (;-) TP
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2009, 05:28:49 PM »
Ray, are you saying that Mach can do that in realtime while interpreting a gcode file?

Randy

Randy,

Yes, it can.  And for simple transforms like that, it'll make no detectable difference in performance.

Regards,
Ray L.
Where in Mach are these transforms entered?
Re: Rotating work offsets around Y
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2009, 05:41:48 PM »
Ray, are you saying that Mach can do that in realtime while interpreting a gcode file?

Randy

Randy,

Yes, it can.  And for simple transforms like that, it'll make no detectable difference in performance.

Regards,
Ray L.
Where in Mach are these transforms entered?

FunctionCfgs->Formulas

Regards,
Ray L.
Regards,
Ray L.