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Author Topic: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing  (Read 281555 times)

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Offline ART

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Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #80 on: October 12, 2009, 10:37:49 PM »
Randy:

 Np problem. Have fun.

Art
Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #81 on: October 22, 2009, 02:51:45 PM »
Hi Art,

I used Tempest to great effect cutting the 'New Hub' file in aluminium, the finish was great despite it taking nearly twice as long but as I said earlier, for me time is not a major issue. However, I am about to cut a couple of temporary wing moulds from MDF and have attached one of the files here. When I use Tempest, the roughing cut, from the start to line 7398 cuts rather hesitantly. The accelerations are smooth but there is a massive difference in speed throughout the cut and the machine seems to almost stop at times. When compared to standard Mach, there is no comparison, standard Mach machines this far better. When it comes to the 'Parallel Lace' operation, line 9814, the reverse is true and Tempest performs far better than standard Mach.

I am using settings of 1 for smoothing and 25000 for jerk. The cutting speeds seem high but I am only taking small cuts from MDF.

Mike

Offline ART

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Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #82 on: October 22, 2009, 03:22:52 PM »
Hi Mike:

  Seems to run here OK..though I only ran to line 700 or so.. Averages about 2450 on the feedrate. I have mine set to 20 line lookahead, 1cv and 25000 jerk. Is thi sthe latest verison?

Art
Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #83 on: October 22, 2009, 04:58:23 PM »
Hi Art,

Yes, it is the latest version. I am finding that the machine slows down dramatically when it encounters the sharper corners and velocity drops to just over 300 compared with the 2500 demanded. I do not notice anywhere near the same effects when using the standard Mach where the speed fluctuations are only down to about 2000 when going round the tighter curves. Speed is certainly maintained when travelling along the very large radius curves, even though they are made up of fairly small segments, but speed drops dramatically round the sharp curves.

I have just run the file again to verify my findings and noticed the same performance running to just line 700. My lookahead was set at 10 and changing it to 20 made no difference.

I will try to make a short video tomorrow as that may give a better idea than words :) It may be that I am expecting too much.

Mike

Offline ART

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Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #84 on: October 22, 2009, 08:00:23 PM »
Mike:

 If its just sharp corners, then you mnay simply be fighting physics. When you specify a Jerk of 25000, youll telling it
to slow on corners to exactly 25000 units/sec^3 of jerk. So thats the speed. Raise your jerk limit to 100,000 and see
if it goes faster.

Art
Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #85 on: November 27, 2009, 06:07:30 PM »
I just found out about Tempest Planning this week. I have been playing around with it some. I have a large router with a fairly heavy gantry I like what I'm seeing so far. It seams to handle 2d type stuff really well and is very smooth.
I tried a 3d file (just air cutting) I wasn't really expecting it to run that well and .. it didnt'.  It ran but was not as smooth for me as the regular mach planner is. On 2d stuff for a large heavy gantry though I am really impressed!

I have noticed sometimes at the start of a file I will get a "thunk" and my drives fault. Not sure what it is. Just thought I would pass that along.


Jeff T.
www.3dcarvestuiod.com

Offline ART

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Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #86 on: November 27, 2009, 08:02:26 PM »
Jeff:

Depending on the 3d file you may need to up the lookahead to 50 or so, and perhaps raise the jerk quite a bit.

Art
Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #87 on: November 27, 2009, 09:36:55 PM »
you read my mind.  very nice update. can i use it normaly? nobody again me?  ok. thanks :)  how can i help you?
Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #88 on: December 10, 2009, 06:16:01 PM »
Art,

I have played some more with the 3d files. I had the look ahead already set to 200.
For my machine it works better to not use tempest planning for 3d files. Regular 2d files tempest works awesome.
I'm not sure if it is because my z axis is pretty fast with good acceleration and when doing 3d files the x or y axis
is pretty much just moving a steady speed. With tempest it definatly slows down the x or y axis and does not
appear as smooth.

It would be nice if Feed Hold and Feed Rate Overide worked ... hint hint :)

Jeff T.

www.3dcarvestudio.com

Offline piv

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Re: Tempest Planning - Preliminary information and testing
« Reply #89 on: February 02, 2010, 05:00:24 AM »
Ive been testing out Mach3 with a linear motor, DSPMC and short segment G code. Ive not tried Tempest yet but have read most of this thread. Ive got a few ideas for a high speed trajectory planner for servo systems. Basically is it possible to have a really simplified trajectory planner that can process about 1000 blocks per second? This is for ridgid machines with servos. I have a good idea of the what it should do and how it might work. Is it possible to get it tried out somehow? Or do I have to learn Linux and EMC to test it, which I would rather not, and anyway that would not be suitable for the Windows world in which we live. Not sure if this should be discussed here or in the DSPMC thread. It seems Mach has a lot of (trajectory) overhead to cope with stepper systems.