Hello Guest it is April 16, 2024, 10:11:48 PM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - MN300

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 »
91
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 18, 2020, 11:42:18 PM »
I haven't see a picture of the TB6600 switches so I don't know how clearly they are marked. That's why I suggested measuring the voltage with the microstepping set to 1 to verify they are set correctly. If you are sure of the settings change the microstepping to 4 will make the operation smoother. That will change the mm/step also.

I don't know why the direction changed. Perhaps changes you made earlier don't take effect until you rebooted the program.
Changing the tick in the Dir Low Active column on the Motor Outputs page will change the direction of the axes.

The stepper driver controls the current  by chopping the voltage to the motor like PWM. That could be the source of a high pitched noise.

92
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 18, 2020, 08:33:34 AM »
The pin numbers in the documentation do correspond to the physical pin numbers of  the parallel port.

The 5 input pins 10, 11, 12, 13 and 15 have the identical circuitry. The assignment of functions, X LS, Y LS, etc is the conventional standard used in the CNC world. You could chose to rearrange them as long as to change the MACH3 screens to match.

The 12 output pins are a bit different. While they all are buffered and appear on the terminal strip, several have additional circuitry.
Pin 1 also connects to the PWM to analog converter used for spindle speed.
Pin 14 has 3 buffers so it can drive multiple stepper enables.
Pin 17 can be jumpered to the relay usually used for spindle enable.

Pins 1, 8, 9, 16 and 17 are not used by your application and could be used for additional functions. For example, Pin 17 and its relay could be used to operate the chip vacuum as the coolant function of MACH3.

Start up and test the steppers one by one. The Y axis appears to be the heaviest and will determine the max speed of the system.
https://www.machsupport.com/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=43939.0;attach=54790;image

Remember the 1.5A current setting is a guess, check for overheating as you tune the motor. Changing from 1.5A to 1.0A will halve the heat. (Watts = current squared times resistance)Since you will be operating in a hot environment you could begin at 1.0A and see if it gives satisfactory performance.

93
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 15, 2020, 08:31:55 AM »
Reversal of the DIR would result in the motor running the wrong direction. That's not a big deal since the direction is easily swapped and depends on the mechanics of the system anyway.

The TB6600 steps the motor on the leading edge of the CLK pulse. Its minimum CLK pulse width is 2.2 microseconds. If MACH3 outputs a 5 microseconds pulse and the signal is reversed the trailing edge becomes the leading edge to the TB6600 and the step happens 5 microseconds later. I think you could live with that much delay.

94
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 14, 2020, 10:24:03 PM »
Let's trust the ST-V2 documentation. The TB6600 DIR and PUL inputs are likely reversed the same way the ENA was.

Too bad about the leak, I hope it dries out soon. There was about 1/2 inch of snow here yesterday.

95
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 14, 2020, 08:39:42 AM »
We wired the TB6600 as the ST-V2 pdf showed, that's common anode wiring. Did you check the boxes for Dir Low Active and Step Low Active as shown in the Motor Outputs diagram?

Did you try to change the DIR signal by using the MDI or JOG to run the motor in both directions?

96
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 12, 2020, 09:18:13 PM »
You may connect the computer, the limits switches can be checked with the MACH3 diagnostic screen.
In fact you can run commands with the MDI or even  G code. It's an open loop system so it won't miss the steppers.

The PUL signals should read 0 volts from their plus to minus terminals when there is no motion. It might be easier to get the meter probes on at the BOB terminals, That would be from the PC +5V to the PUL output for each drive.

The DIR signals can be checked too, they change with the direction the steppers are told to move.

You don't need the spindle but if you enable it you should see the LED on the BOB light and hear the relay click. Then you'll know it's ready if you ever want it.

The full 24 volts on the motor terminals is expected when nothing is connected. When the motor is connected the voltage will be the current times the resistance. 1.5A times 3 ohms = 4.5V This is assuming you have set x1 microstepping. At others setting the current changes with the position.

I don't see E-STOP wiring in the photo, I assume that's coming or somewhere out of view. Turning off the 24V should signal E-STOP to the PC, one more thing you can check now.

97
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 10, 2020, 11:53:07 AM »
Start up notes:
Before applying power double check the wiring, especially the power and ground. A mistake with those can damage your equipment. Mixed up signal wiring will keep the system from operating correctly but is less likely to damage anything.

Set up MACH according to the ST-V2 instruction.
Note: The wiring diagram connects the breakout board and stepper drivers as common anode.

Disconnect the 24V from the TB6600s. Disconnect the 5V wire from the 5V supply to the BOB.
Power on the system and check that the wire from the 5V supply measures +5V to the BOB PC GND.
Turn off power and connect the 5V supply.
Turn on power and use the MACH3 diagnostics to verify the limit switches work. The E-STOP input should trip when the E-STOP switch is pushed. Power off when done testing.

Connect the 24V to one TB6600. Set its switches to
Microstep = 1     S1 = on, S2 = on, S3 = off
Current = 1.5      S4 = on, S5 = on, S6 = off
Power on and immediately measure the voltage on the motor windings.
One winding will have 4.5 volts from the - to the  + terminal. The meter may show either polarity. (4.5V = 1.5A times 3 ohms, the total winding resistance.)
This test shows the switches are set correctly. It’s sometimes hard to be sure which switch position is off or on.

Turn power off and connect the 24V to the other TB6600s. Set the switches as shown on the wiring diagram.

98
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 10, 2020, 08:01:01 AM »
One E-STOP contact in the mains line to the 24V power supply will do. P10 should be wired to ground which will tell MACH3 everything is OK. When the E-STOP switch interrupts the 24V the BOB will not be able to send ON signals from the inputs to the parallel port.
Rather than just a housing for the BOB can you box for all the components? Either make something or use a large storage bin. Then add large screened holes to the top and bottom.

99
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 09, 2020, 07:17:39 AM »
Your motor wire are correct.

100
General Mach Discussion / Re: Looking for good DIY controller kit supplier
« on: December 08, 2020, 09:09:22 PM »
The 24 volts into pin 6 is correct. It used to power the motor and is also reduced to power the internal logic. The TB6600 has opto couplers to isolate its circuits from the inputs.

Pages: « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 »