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Messages - ViKiNG

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1
General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 24, 2017, 01:21:34 AM »
Thanks for all your help Craig

I have purchased the following Allen Bradley motor and drive on eBay;

AC SERVO MOTOR MPL-A320P-SJ22AA, 1.3kW, 5000RPM, and matched servo drive; Ultra 3000 2098-DSD-020. Am looking forward to getting my machine set up and running. The motor fits really nicely into my machine, its a very compact motor!

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 21, 2017, 05:49:24 AM »
I'm off to bed now, tomorrow I'll see if I can PM you and give you a call?

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 21, 2017, 05:43:41 AM »
Hi Craig

Just read your bio and I see that like myself you are also in NZ, I'm in Hamilton, what city are you in?

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 21, 2017, 04:37:19 AM »
Hi Craig

I get what you are saying. I see that there are plenty of motors and drives for sale on eBay for reasonable prices. This definitely looks like a good option. Am I selling myself short @ 730W, should I look at the 1.3kW? How is it that you can run your A330P which is rated at 12A continuous from a 10A outlet? Are you running all the axis drives and other electrics for the machine off the same supply?

Thanks

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 20, 2017, 03:30:30 PM »
Thanks Craig, the size in not a problem, I could go up to 110 square. The power of 700W and current at 5A is good as I need to run the complete machine off 230V 10A wall outlet. What you are suggesting looks good. The uncertainty is if the AC can deliver enough torque. I am not sure what it will delivery through the rev range. I have had a look for the performance curves and not been able to find them. The M4-2950 B DC option specification is continuous torque of 2Nm and peak of 14.9Nm. The DC option would definitely cost more, I am trying to get the best performance for around 5A current draw

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 20, 2017, 03:58:20 AM »
Yes you have the correct drawing of the DC motor that I am looking at. Thanks for the eBay links for the AC Allen Bradley, that's really awesome information and looks like a really good alternative. I am very impressed with the compact size of the motor. The question that I have is how this compares for torque against the DC motor. Time for some research on the net...

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 19, 2017, 02:41:09 AM »
Yes it is always nice to have the good gear, its hard to beat quality tools. When I buy tools I like to buy quality as I know I will have use out of if for a long time. Great that you have made parts to improve your machine. It always feel good when a project works out well.
I am lucky that I work in a toolroom and have access to use the machine tools. This is coming in handy to make bits for my project.

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 18, 2017, 10:44:39 PM »
Thanks for the reply Craig, that's all really good sound advice. I was guessing that a new AC motor with a new VFD would be a more expensive option and like you say research is the sound way to find out. Interesting that it may now give DC a run for its money. I have another reason to go to DC and that is I am remaking the spindle to go from R8 taper to BT30 taper. This will also enable me to add a support bearing on the tail of the spindle. The original spindle only has a pair of angular contact bearings at the nose end of the spindle. This is an improvement that the manufactured also made to the more recent models. With this modification there is now limited space for the spindle motor and the form factor of the DC motor is a perfect fit for the machine. So I am committed to using a DC motor. I tried to embed an image of my machine in my first post but it did not work for me. I see that there are very few images in the forum threads which is a shame as a picture is worth a least a thousand ...

Thanks

Keith

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General Mach Discussion / Re: Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 18, 2017, 06:04:17 AM »
Hi Craig

The reason that I chose this particular motor is that the machine manufacturer dropped the AC motor and replaced it with an SEM www.sem.co.uk branded motor. This has now been taken over by Callan callantechnology.com . The two big draw cards for me are

1. The physical size (Ø108mm) is a good fit for the space in the machine head
2. Motor speed is high at 5000 RPM, most of what I have found on the net has a max RPM of 3000

I had not found Allen Bradley, so will have a look into this brand.

I had not though of using a range of preset speeds, something I will also have a look at. My day job is NC programming and am used to the luxury of outputting any speed that is calculated from the CAM software. It is also valuable to be able to over ride the speed at the machine to tune the cutting conditions

Thanks

10
General Mach Discussion / Mill Spindle Speed Control - DC Motor
« on: August 18, 2017, 04:27:18 AM »
Hi

I have recently purchased a 1984 Denford Triac. This was marketed as a "desktop" mill. It is larger and heavier than I would put on my desktop. It has 300mm X travel and weighs 250kg

I am in the process of replacing the existing under powered (1/2 Hp) spindle motor with something with more power and torque. The original motor is AC and I am replacing it with a DC servo motor manufactured by callantechnology.com I am looking at the 746W (1Hp) M4-2950 B which uses 0-10VDC for speed control. I will also need a DC Drive - Speed Controller, something like the Parker 507 (http://ph.parker.com/us/en/dc-motor-speed-controller-dc506-507-508-series).

I have a C11 NC board (cnc4pc.com) and a USB SmoothStepper BOB (warp9td.com). I am planning on using either Mach3 or Mach4.

My question is

How does Mach3/4 control the motor speed. I am guessing that Mach3/4 sends 0-10VDC to the DC drive which then sends it on to the motor. I would appreciate some detail of how this works. I have solid mechanical background but limited electrical experience.

I would appreciate some advice on a suitable DC drive for the motor. I have not found one that matches the motor specs which are: 115V, 10A, 0-500RPM. Power input is single phase 230V 15A

Thanks

Keith

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