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Messages - AndyMenzel

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1
Yeah, it's helpful information I didn't think like this. So I can use a.c. type of SSR (solid state relay) and let you know my update soon.

Thanks again.

2
Hello Tweakie, ,

Thanks for your kind reply.
Sorry for forgetting mention my question, can I use Solid state relay (SSR) instead of solid state switch?

The main issue is settlement, prosperity, and cost. Exchanges are tinier and more reasonable than solid state switches. With a switch, I have also need to run thicker wires (enough to manage 30 - 40 amps) since it requires more voltage than an exchange. Considering a hand-off as a remote, it gives security by giving extra partition from the power supply. As I found the datasheet of MCTC4825JLB.

Thanks again for replying me and sorry for my poor English.

3
A solid state relay (SSR) is a contrasting option to utilizing a great switch when you need to kill a circuit on or off. The SSR is activated by an outer voltage connected over its control terminal. It has no moving parts and along these lines can work considerably more rapidly and last longer than a conventional switch. In the event that it utilizes infrared light as a contact; the two sides of the hand-off are photograph coupled.

Wiring solid state relay
The wires of a SSR are littler and of a higher gage than a switch. SSRs are likewise speedier, littler and have a more drawn out lifetime than a mechanical relay. They help increment wellbeing since you're managing a lesser voltage and amperage, giving you a littler voltage/amperage controlling a higher voltage/amperage. (According to a datasheet of MCTC4825JLB https://www.icrfq.com/part/3155335-MCTC4825JLB.html ) For significantly higher voltages a SSR is a great option when a customary switch can't be utilized due to wear out under the current. 

Solid State Relay (DC/DC):

Connect (R) positive terminal to the push button switch.
Connect (R) negative terminal to the negative terminal on battery 1.
Connect (L) positive terminal to the positive terminal on battery 2.
Connect (L) negative terminal to the positive terminal on load.

Battery 1:
Note that battery one was utilized as detachment.
Connect the negative terminal of battery 1 to the negative terminal of the SSR (R).
Connect the positive terminal of battery 1 to the push button switch.

Push Button Switch:
Interface one terminal to the positive terminal (R) of the SSR.
Associate the second terminal to the positive terminal of battery 1.

Load:
Interface the positive terminal of the heap to the negative terminal (L) of the SSR.
Interface the negative terminal of the heap to the negative terminal of battery 2.

Battery 2:
Interface the positive terminal on battery 2 to the positive terminal on the yield.
Interface the negative terminal on battery 2 to the negative terminal on the heap.

Would anyone be able to help me? I am extremely puzzled about this inquiry. I am to a fantastic degree overpowered about this request.
Thanks.

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