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arbus
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« on: December 02, 2010, 08:12:43 AM »

Anyone interested in cutting keys (key and lock type keys) here's a wizard for cutting them http://keycut.webs.com/.
Mainly for cutting them to code (originating) and mainly for milled type of keys, but I have a wizard for cylindrical(normal) type of keys too.
Also have made a wizard for making a Button code. It is called the 'profile maker'  you enter the key parameters and it produces the code to add to a button. The button produces the code to cut the key...
code is in the download section of above web site.

ar
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Dan13
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« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2010, 09:34:05 AM »

Hi Ar,

Very interesting! Nice application. Thank for sharing!

What is it mostly used for - reproduction of existing keys or producing new ones?

Dan

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arbus
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« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2010, 05:51:01 PM »

You can use it for both reproduction and producing new ones.

It has evolved a bit over the years.  I first made wizards using the probe to decode the key, work out the factory depths and reproduce an accurate key. Doing this would allow for wear in the key and an inaccurately duplicated key.  But using it in practice where time is money, It is much faster to visually decode the key(look at it and say the cuts are 3551276 eg and check it with code software if needed)

But the primary function is for it to cut to code or to tell it what the depths are and for it to cut a key to those depths.
There is some more info at our Brisbane Locksmith sitehttp://www.24hourlocksmith.com.au/ with some links to videos etc.

I use the probe mainly to align the key blank in the vice, using a macro.

ar
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Dan13
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« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2010, 01:57:07 AM »

Hi AR,

So how does it work if I needed to make a key to match an existing one? I can see no point in being able to produce a new key if you don't have a matching lock for it.

Dan
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Tweakie.CNC
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« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2010, 08:21:26 AM »

Hi ar,

Thank you for the link, it looks very interesting.

Tweakie.
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arbus
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« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2010, 07:23:48 PM »

Dan, I use it mainly for producing new keys when all keys have been lost.  So if you loose your key to your car you can use the wizard to cut a new key.   The only trick is you need to work out the code of the key.

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Ya-Nvr-No
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2010, 08:23:31 PM »

How about a standard house door key? How do we determine the code/trick? Is there a position to depth secret code. I would assume that it is different for each key company manufacturer.

But I would think knowing the number of pins and the distance between them is a starting point. Then measure from a reference point to determine the differences/heights. Then it's a matter of mapping out the transitions and filling in the boxes.

 
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Dan13
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2010, 12:41:10 AM »

The only trick is you need to work out the code of the key.

And how is that done?

Dan
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arbus
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« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2010, 03:48:03 AM »

Dan, ok, 20 years of Locksmithing condensed into a couple of sentences...  Smiley

1st and easiest is to get the code from either the dealer or some other source.   The code is then converted using code software into the actual cuts in the key. eg. code may be R3428 cuts are 44387653.

2nd if no code is available you could pull out a lock (door lock) and decode the wafers of the lock (work out if their depths), then either cut a key straight from these numbers or decode the wafers you have and try to determine the correct code for the car.

Once you have the cuts you use the wizard to cut the key.


Ya-Nvr-No,
Standard house type keys can be done the same way, but the wizards are more for cutting to code.  eg. you have probably got a filing cabinet or letter box with a number stamped on it.  This no is a code no that can be converted into the cuts of the key.  Use a wizard to cut the key.
Yes you are right every type of lock/manufacturer has different spacing and depth for their keys.  The wizard for house type keys allows you to create and save a file for each different type of key.  You have to load the correct file to cut the specific type of key.
Same with the Milled type of car keys.  there is a wizard called "Key Profile Maker" that allows you to set the space and depth for each type of car.  Then it makes a code for the button.  It dosent quite get it right as the start and end of each key usually has to be altered for a specific key type.

Locksmiths cut ALOT of keys to code rather then to sample. for eg imagine a Master Key System in a school or hospital, etc.  Each key has to be cut to the exact code (cuts).  They cant be cut to a sample.
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Dan13
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« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2010, 11:15:02 AM »

Hi AR,

Thanks for the info. Have been always curious about how this works.

Dan
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